Paths

“Anyone that tells you they know how you can recover without ever talking to you or listening to your story is going to have you walking down their path to recovery not yours. Go to the person that tells you they have no idea how to get you sober but will help you figure it out.” – T


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What Is Suboxone?

Many effective drug programs use medicines to relieve side effects. Certain medications also make it easier for people to stop using drugs and to stay sober. For example, suboxone mimics the effects of opioids to relieve cravings and withdrawal symptoms. Answering the question, “What is Suboxone?” demonstrates how this drug can be both helpful and dangerous.
What Is Suboxone Specifically?
This prescription brand contains the drugs buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid that blocks these drugs from affecting opiate receptors in the brain. At the same time, it reduces cravings by making the brain think that it’s an opioid. Naloxone is a drug that also works to reverse opioid effects.
The Food and Drug Administration allows doctors to prescribe Suboxone in several treatment settings. For example, many treatment centers use the drug in heroin and methadone detox. In addition, maintenance therapy is also possible with Suboxone and allows people to keep taking it until they’re stable.
While other medications offer similar benefits, Suboxone is different because primary physicians can prescribe it. They’re able to do this because many people continue maintenance therapy even after recovery. In addition, it can help them adjust to normal life outside of the rehab center. Regular doctors can help them manage their custom treatment plans.
What is Suboxone Used for During Drug Treatment?
Medical professionals can use Suboxone at any stage of opioid addiction treatment. Because of that, the drug can be a long-term method of addiction management. As part of an extensive recovery plan, it can completely eliminate cravings.
Not to mention, it also provides pain relief and reduces stress. Its depressant effects create an overall sense of well-being and calmness which helps people relax. However, it’s important that patients maintain follow-up appointments to ensure recovery is successful.
The Dangers of Suboxone
Although Suboxone helps manage opioid addiction recovery, it can lead to dependence. Overall, it still has similar effects on the brain as opioids. People who are at the highest risk are those who still abuse narcotics and simply use Suboxone to avoid withdrawal.
Aside from the risk for dependence, it can also be dangerous to stop taking Suboxone suddenly. It can cause opioid withdrawal symptoms such as diarrhea, joint and muscle pain, and insomnia. Additionally, some people simply aren’t unaware that the drug can cause harmful side effects. These could include headaches, low energy, flu-like symptoms, stomach pain, and sweating.
It Takes More to Overcome Addiction
Suboxone is only effective when it’s part of a comprehensive addiction treatment plan. Relying on this drug for an extended period of time has dangerous side effects. After medical detox, counseling is often necessary to address the cause of their problem, learn coping strategies, and avoid relapse.
Comprehensive Substance Use Treatment with Steps to Recovery
You can get the extensive substance use rehab you need at Steps to Recovery. We offer rehab programs for both heroin and prescription opioids. Our well-rounded spectrum of treatment includes:
Interventions
Outpatient and intensive outpatient rehab
Partial hospitalization program
Sober living program
Dual diagnosis treatment
Men’s and women’s rehab
Don’t let heroin or prescription opioids keep you from a life of fulfillment. Learn how to overcome the problem and stay sober. Call us now at 866-488-8684 to for more information about our rehab center.
The post What Is Suboxone? appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


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What Is Lean?

More and more substances make their way into people’s hands every year. Lean is one them. However, a lot of people tend to wonder, “What is lean?” Increasing your knowledge of this potent drink can help you avoid its dangerous effects.
What Is Lean Specifically?
Lean is just one name for this concoction. Others include dirty Sprite, purple drank, and sizzurp as well as other variations. The main ingredient is prescription-strength cough syrup. To mask the flavor of the medicine, people combine it with soft drinks, fruit-flavored candies or both.
What Is Lean and Its History?
Although lean has become popular as of late, it’s been around since the 1960s. It started with blues musicians in Houston pouring Robitussin into beer. In the 1980s, the trend grew when hip-hop culture became mainstream.
Rappers have been promoting lean consumption throughout the 1990s, and people widely abused it during the early 2000s. Stars such as Three 6 Mafia and Lil Wayne endorse the drink in their lyrics. However, sports stars have a track record of drinking lean too. For example, Oakland Raiders quarterback JaMarcus Russell and former San Diego Chargers safety Terrence Kiel have all mentioned their lean use.
In the late 2000s, the popularity of lean declined. However, demand went up again in 2011. With this resurgence, lean has become more common among young adults because they’re influenced by the celebrities who drink it.
Additionally, teens experiment with high doses of normal cough syrup to get high on dextromethorphan (DXM). This common ingredient causes hallucinations in large amounts. Nearly half of over-the-counter cough syrups contain DXM, so it’s legal and cheap for teens to buy. Plus, parents don’t recognize it as dangerous at first glance because of its purple color.
Why Lean Is Dangerous
Although DXM is dangerous in high doses, prescription cough syrup is a bigger threat. Its ingredients include codeine and promethazine.
Codeine is a powerful opioid drug, which is addictive. In fact, people often use codeine to make heroin. It suppresses breathing and can lead to respiratory failure. Promethazine is an antihistamine that has sedative effects and impairs motor functions.
Together, these ingredients cause impaired vision, dizziness, confusion, nausea, and rash. Some people even experience seizures and memory problems. In addition, regularly drinking lean can lead to dental decay, urinary tract infections, constipation, and weight gain.
Furthermore, it’s easy for people to overdose on lean. No two drinks have the same ratio of prescription cough syrup to soda. Because of this, there’s no way to know how much codeine is in one drink. Since the soda masks the medicine flavor, people also lose track of how much they drink.
Lean Addiction Help at Steps to Recovery
If you think that you have a lean addiction, Steps to Recovery can help. We offer codeine addiction treatment for overcoming your substance problem. We also offer various outpatient programs for additional drug addictions, including:
Prescription drug addiction rehab
Meth addiction rehab
Alcohol addiction rehab
Heroin addiction rehab
Don’t be a lean statistic. Let our compassionate staff create a treatment plan that addresses your needs. Dial 866-488-8684 now to begin working toward recovery.
The post What Is Lean? appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


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What Are the Causes of Alcoholism?

Alcoholism is a complex mental disease and the result of alcohol dependence. For decades, researchers have studied why one person develops an alcohol use disorder while others don’t. They’ve learned there are many causes of alcoholism.
Causes of Alcoholism
Dozens of risk factors can lead to alcohol use disorder development. Simply having these risk factors, however, doesn’t guarantee that someone develops alcoholism. However, learning about the most common causes can make many aware of their risk so they can take preventative measures.
Ongoing Drinking
Drinking regularly is a major risk factor for developing alcohol problems. For example, binge and heavy drinking change the chemical balance in the brain. Eventually, people lose their ability to control how much and how often they drink.
Binge drinking occurs when women have at least four drinks on a single occasion at least one day in a month. For men, a binge involves at least five drinks. Experts say that heavy drinking occurs when people binge five or more days in a month.
Genetics
It might surprise some to learn that their genetics could increase their risk of developing an alcohol use disorder. Overall, this factor has the biggest influence on who develops the disease.
The genetics behind it are very complex, and experts don’t fully understand it yet. The reason is that multiple genes interact to cause the problem. Researchers have found at least 51 genes that put people at risk. However, not all of them have to be present for the disease to develop.
Environment
People’s living environments play a role as well. Generally, people are more likely to develop drinking problems based on how frequently alcohol is in their everyday lives. For example, it’s easier and less expensive to obtain alcohol in certain states, which may increase the risk. Additionally, wealthier families are more likely to have a history of alcoholism than lower-income families.
Mental Health Problems
Mental conditions play a significant role in alcohol use disorder development. For example, social anxiety, bipolar disorder, and depression are some of the most common. People with these conditions use alcohol to self-medicate their symptoms. Additionally, experts warn that having one mental problem increases the likelihood of developing another.
Cultural and Social Factors
In general, the cultural and social acceptance of drinking makes people more likely to develop the disease. In some cases, cultures and social environments encourage drinking. For instance, college students celebrate drinking, especially binge drinking.
Cultural and social factors can also affect alcohol treatment. For example, people who live in cultures that shame drinking often hide the problem and hesitate to get help.
Get Help for Alcohol Use Disorder at Steps to Recovery
An Alcohol use disorder requires a full spectrum of treatment that includes alcohol detox, rehab, and aftercare. Steps to Recovery provides the rehab you need without causing serious disruptions to your life. Our comprehensive programs and services include:
Outpatient rehab
Intensive outpatient program
Partial hospitalization program
Men’s and women’s rehab
Individual and group therapy
Family therapy and education
Relapse prevention
Don’t let alcohol overwhelm your life. Put your trust in our rehab center to help you overcome drinking. Call 866-488-8684 now to begin your journey today.
The post What Are the Causes of Alcoholism? appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


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