Is there a Connection Between Alcohol and Depression?

Alcohol is on the menu for most any celebration. If you want to be happy and cheerful, you drink. However, there’s a dark side to the drug. For instance, did you know that there’s a connection between alcohol and depression?
The Alcohol High and Low
Have a drink or two, and you’ll notice your inhibitions slipping. You’re more at ease in social situations. You feel like you’re relaxing. In contrast, depression symptoms occur when you overdo alcohol consumption.
You might feel sad and mourn past relationships. You feel guilt over missed opportunities. For some, the guilt turns into anger and violent outbursts. Frequently, the depression continues even after alcohol consumption ends.
How Alcohol and Depression Connect
It’s possible for depression to become a substance-induced mood disorder. The drug affects specific neurotransmitters in the brain. Therefore, it creates a chemical imbalance. For some people, it results in a worsening of depression.
Others reach for alcohol as a way to deal with an underlying depressive disorder. In this case, alcohol and depression connect through self-medicating behaviors. You drink to distract yourself from intrusive thoughts and feelings. Over time, you develop a dependency on the drug.
This situation eventually begins to feed on itself. Depression and alcohol abuse lead to problematic situations. Furthermore, you find yourself in trouble with friends or family members. Alcohol and depression now connect because the drug causes the disorder, which you try to handle by using the drug.
Deal with Both Conditions Concurrently for Best Results
Work with a rehab facility that specializes in dual diagnosis treatment. Therapists help you manage your depression while assisting you in overcoming addiction. Modalities include:
One-on-one talk therapy for goal-setting
Group counseling as a way to integrate peer support in recovery
Psychotherapy that helps with the co-occurring disorder
Family therapy to encourage open communication and an end to co-dependency patterns
Life skills training, which provides you with alternatives for dealing with stressors and triggers
In many cases, you can receive this level of care at the partial hospitalization level. You continue to live at home but visit the rehab center every day for treatment. There’s no need to quit your job or let go of family responsibilities. As you progress in your therapy, you’ll eventually graduate to an intensive outpatient program.
That said, some program participants might start at the outpatient level. It depends on your treatment needs and the severity of the alcohol use disorder. Talking with an intake counselor at a facility helps you to make this decision.
How to Get Help for Alcohol and Depression Abuse at the Same Time
The Pennsylvania addiction recovery services that Steps to Recovery provide is an excellent starting point for healing. Find out how alcohol and depression are affecting every facet of your life and how to overcome both. You don’t have to continue in this vicious cycle of alcohol abuse and mood disorders. Call 866-488-8684 right now for immediate assistance.
The post Is there a Connection Between Alcohol and Depression? appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

Understanding the Difference Between Detox vs Rehab

Overcoming drug and alcohol addiction isn’t easy, but it’s worth it. Instead of feeling stuck in a damaging cycle of using, you can break free and create a better future. If you don’t know the difference between detox vs rehab, you might not understand why both steps are so important. See how each benefits you as you work toward lasting sobriety.
What’s the Difference Between Detox vs Rehab?
Many people try and quit using on their own, but they quickly relapse. If they only go through the detox process, it’s easy to see why.
Detox and rehab aren’t the same things, although both of them are important for beating addiction. What are the differences between detox vs rehab?
Detox is the process of getting all addictive substances out of your body. This could mean going “cold turkey,” where you stop using completely. Depending on the severity of your addiction, however, cold turkey may be too dangerous.
When you detox, your body goes through withdrawal, which includes a range of symptoms, ranging from mild to intense. You may feel nauseous, anxious, tired, confused and depressed. However, detox doesn’t last long, and the worst of your symptoms occur in the first few days after you stop using.
Rehab happens after drug alcohol detox. You may attend inpatient or outpatient treatment. Rehab lasts longer than detox, with many programs running 30 to 60 days, sometimes longer.
During rehab, you participate in various forms of therapies. You also learn to manage stress and negative emotions in positive, productive ways.
Why You Need Both Detox and Rehab
There are differences between detox vs rehab, but both are essential for lasting recovery.
You must get clean before you’re in the right frame of mind to go through rehab, which is why detox is so important. However, you can’t stop at detox because this process doesn’t address the deeper issues behind your addiction. That’s what rehab does.
In rehab, you’ll attend individual and group therapy sessions. You might also participate in family therapy and behavioral therapies. All of these therapies work together to heal you on every level. You’ll learn valuable coping skills that you can use for life.
There are differences in detox vs rehab. When you go through both, you have a better chance at maintaining your sobriety.
Authentic and Collaborative Addiction Treatment
Steps to Recovery is an addiction treatment center that provides Pennsylvania addiction recovery services. Located in Levittown, we can refer you to a PA detox center. At our facility, clients can start an effective rehab program that may include:
Addiction counseling
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)
Outpatient treatment program
Intensive outpatient program (IOP)
Dual diagnosis treatment
Addiction treatment can make the difference between not having a future and creating a better one than you thought possible. Let the caring staff at Steps to Recovery show you how to win the battle against drug and alcohol dependency by calling us today at 866-488-8684.
The post Understanding the Difference Between Detox vs Rehab appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

How Addictive is Xanax?

There’s a massive addiction crisis in the United States, and one of the primary reasons is addictive prescription medications. While opioids are a leading cause of overdose and can lead to the use of heroin, other medications are dangerous as well. Xanax is a medication people use to manage symptoms of anxiety, but it can lead to fatal consequences. If you have a loved one who is taking this medication, it’s important that you know the answer to, “How addictive is Xanax?”
How Addictive is Xanax for Anxiety Patients?
Addiction is an extremely cunning disease, and it makes people believe that they don’t have a problem. This is a situation that becomes even worse when the addiction is to medications that are given by a doctor. It’s easy to justify and rationalize use when a doctor s providing the medication for symptoms of anxiety. The problem is, many people don’t ask, “How addictive is Xanax?”, and many doctors don’t disclose this information very often either.
Some of the symptoms doctors prescribe Xanax for include the following:
Racing thoughts
Constant worry
Irrational fears
Increased heart rate
Anxiety in social situations
The problem with Xanax is that not only does it alleviate symptoms of anxiety, but it also releases pleasure chemicals in the brain. While someone may have started taking the medication to decrease anxiety, that can change over time. Due to the way Xanax affects the brain, the person may begin using the medication to get a feeling rather than alleviate anxiety. This is typically how a Xanax addiction develops, and one of the primary signs is when a person becomes physically dependent.
How Addictive is Xanax for Young People?
More and more studies show that young people are experimenting with prescription medications more than ever before. Xanax is one of the primary substances that young people turn to because it’s so easily accessible. Even with alcohol drug education provided by schools, many young people still experiment with the drug to get high. Young people are far more susceptible to the disease of addiction due to the way the brain develops. Young people don’t have a fully developed prefrontal cortex, which is responsible for helping make logical decisions when it comes to assessing potential risks.
Getting Help for an Addiction to Xanax
Steps to Recovery is a drug and alcohol treatment center in Levittown, PA. We want you to know the answer to, “How addictive is Xanax?” so you can get the help for someone you love. Addiction is a progressive illness, so it’s much easier to treat when the person gets help as soon as possible. We understand that some people who have an addiction to this medication struggle with anxiety, but we can help. We offer dual diagnosis treatment as well as the following programs:
Family therapy
Group therapy
Cognitive behavioral therapy
How addictive is Xanax? Don’t wait to find out. For the help you need, call Steps to Recovery today at 866-488-8684.
The post How Addictive is Xanax? appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

What Are Cognitive Disorders?

It’s not very often that people suffer from only one mental disorder. Experts suggest that once the brain develops any disorder, it’s easy for it to form another. Since addiction is a psychological disorder, it’s easy for people to develop other conditions alongside it. One such example is cognitive disorders.
What Are Cognitive Disorders?
Cognitive disorders (CDs) refer to an entire category of mental health conditions. In general, they’re subtle to start with but eventually impede on people’s quality of life. To get a better understanding of these disorders, people need to know which disorders fit into this category.
Types of CDs
All of the disorders that fit into this category are neurocognitive disorders. Some of them come from substance abuse, including substance-induced cognitive impairment. Other disorders that fit into this category include:
Developmental disorders
Dementia
Amnesia
Motor skills disorders
Alzheimer’s disease
Unfortunately, doctors don’t know what causes cognitive disorders in most people. However, some of them say that CDs occur because of a hormonal imbalance. Others say that they’re the result of genetics that parents pass down to their children. With that said, poor nutrition and a lack of cognitive stimulation during childhood can also lead to cognitive conditions.
Treating CDs
Treating CDs depends heavily on the types of disorders that people have. For example, Alzheimer’s disease isn’t curable. However, doctors can use specific techniques to slow down the progression of this disorder. In other cases, doctors can use therapies to help people overcome cognitive disorders.
For example, cognitive behavioral therapy often helps people with mild forms of CDs. Sometimes, the treatment has to address a trauma that led to the development of the CD in the first place.
Signs of CDs
To get help for someone who suffers from CDs, people need to know what to look for. Some common signs include confusion, memory loss, and poor motor coordination. Others suffer from more objective problems such as impaired judgment. It’s often hard to spot signs of impaired judgment since this symptom is subjective.
Learn More About Overcoming Addiction and Underlying Disorders
At Steps to Recovery, we go out of our way to provide reliable addiction therapy services. Using programs such as dual diagnosis treatment, we can help you overcome addiction and cognitive disorders. Providing individual treatment plans sets us apart from other rehab centers in the area. Some of the services that we use include:
Family counseling
Group and individual therapies
Trauma therapy
Intensive outpatient rehab
Coping skills education
Holistic therapy
Don’t try to treat your addiction without addressing underlying disorders. Learn more about the link between cognitive disorders and addiction. Reach out to us at 866-488-8684 to learn more about our Pennsylvania addiction recovery services.
The post What Are Cognitive Disorders? appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

Common Social Anxiety Disorder Symptoms

Numerous mental disorders go hand in hand with substance use disorder. One example is a social anxiety disorder. It’s important for people to learn more about this disorder and some social anxiety disorder symptoms. The more that they know, the more ready they’ll be to seek out help or find help for their loved one.
What Is Social Anxiety Disorder?
Also called social phobia, this condition is one of the most common anxiety disorders that people develop. As the name suggests, it makes them afraid of social situations. These might include answering questions in front of peers, meeting new people, going on a date or attending social events.
When people with social anxiety disorder engage in activities in front of others, they feel fear and anxiety. They worry that others might reject, judge or even humiliate them. This fear or anxiety feeds social anxiety disorder symptoms.
What Are Some Social Anxiety Disorder Symptoms?
People might experience several social anxiety disorder symptoms. Some of the most common include:
Increased heart rate
Fear of being around people, especially people they don’t know
A sick or nauseous feeling in their stomachs
Fear of attending social events
Worrying about visiting a public place days or weeks in advance
Diarrhea
Difficulty talking normally in front of people
These are just a few social anxiety disorder symptoms that people might experience. They generally feel better when they attend social events with others who they trust, such as close friends or spouses.
The Link Between Social Anxiety Disorder and Addiction
Is there a link between social anxiety disorder and substance use disorder? Yes. In fact, many people try to self-medicate with drugs and alcohol instead of seeking professional help.
Unfortunately, the drugs and alcohol only provide temporary relief for the symptoms. Because of that, those who self-medicate continue to take the drugs to keep getting relief. Abusing drugs in this way can quickly lead to addiction.
At this point, getting mental health treatment is just as important as getting help for the addiction. If they only get help for the substance abuse, then their social anxiety disorder symptoms will only trigger a relapse. They must seek treatment for both issues.
We Can Help You With Underlying Mental Disorders
At Steps to Recovery, we provide treatment for substance use disorder and underlying mental disorders. We know that treating problems such as social anxiety disorder is just as important as treating the addiction itself. That’s why our Pennsylvania addiction recovery services take underlying mental disorders seriously. Some of the services and programs that we offer include:
Residential treatment
Cognitive behavioral therapy
Dual diagnosis treatment
Outpatient treatment
Aftercare
Individual and group therapies
Don’t let underlying disorders spur on your addiction. Let us teach you more about social anxiety disorder symptoms. Get help and more information today at 866-488-8684.
The post Common Social Anxiety Disorder Symptoms appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

How to Quit Drinking Alcohol

Learning how to quit drinking alcohol isn’t always easy. Some people can stop drinking whenever they want. Others have an unquenchable thirst for the drug that gets worse the less that they drink. When this happens, learning how to give up alcohol takes more than just willpower.
How to Quit Drinking Alcohol
Before people can learn how to quit drinking alcohol, they have to ask themselves if they’re ready for a change. Until they’re willing to stop, it’s hard to get them the help that they need. They have to want to change because quitting drinking is a journey that takes time. If they aren’t committed to the goal, they’ll likely relapse.
Lifestyle Changes
The next thing that people need to consider is lifestyle changes. To beat alcohol addiction, they have to change how they live. They must keep alcohol out of their homes and engage in activities that don’t involve alcohol use.
As part of these lifestyle changes, it’s a good idea for people to learn about alcohol. Alcohol drug education is a great way for them to learn the dangers of this drug. It’s a good idea for close friends and family members to learn about alcohol as well. The more others around them know, the better the chances that they have of cutting out alcohol altogether.
Ask for Help
When people struggle with drug addiction, they tend to forget that they can ask for help. Family and friends are often willing to lend them a helping hand. They can usually provide the push to get professional treatment to kick the bad habit.
Asking for help also shows loved ones that they’re ready to change. Showing this willingness is essential when it comes to learning how to quit drinking alcohol.
Rebuild Lines of Communication
Some people feel like they can’t ask for help because loved ones don’t talk to them anymore. The reason is usually that the alcohol abuse has broken the lines of communication between them. Family therapy and other programs in rehab can rebuild these bonds. Doing so is vital to form a system of support for after treatment.
Let Steps to Recovery Help You Today
If you have a problem with alcohol addiction, it’s time to visit an alcohol addiction treatment center. Only this type of facility can help you get better and kick your substance use disorder to the curb. Some of the programs that Steps to Recovery offers include:
Outpatient rehab program
Inpatient treatment
Family therapy
Individual and group therapies
Aftercare
Dual diagnosis treatment
Don’t let your drinking problem cause you any more harm. Learn more about how to quit drinking alcohol. Reach out to us for help today at 866-488-8684.
The post How to Quit Drinking Alcohol appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

The Connection Between OCD and Addiction

Most people know that addiction is a mental disorder. However, once the brain develops one disorder, it’s extremely easy for it to form another. In fact, that’s why there’s a link between most mental disorders and addiction. One example of such a relationship is the connection between OCD and addiction.
What Is OCD?
OCD stands for obsessive-compulsive disorder. This mental illness causes unwanted and recurring obsessive thoughts and compulsive actions. The intrusive thoughts typically trigger unsettling feelings.
When people think of those who suffer from OCD, people who engage in odd behavior often come to mind. For example, they might think of people who wash their hands repeatedly or have strong compulsions to organize things. While these are examples of OCD behaviors, they don’t describe all cases.
OCD makes people repeat routine activities or have a strong need to continue to ask for reassurance. It affects them on a magnitude of levels. Because of that, it becomes difficult to have relationships with people who have OCD. It’s even more of a concern when they also struggle with addiction.
The Link Between OCD and Addiction
The first and most significant link between OCD and addiction is that they’re both mental disorders. When people have one of them, they’re more susceptible to the other. Those who are aware of this connection can take proactive steps to avoid developing an addiction. However, those who already have an addiction can’t stop the onset of mental disorders such as OCD without help.
Another link between OCD and addiction is that OCD makes people engage in routine behaviors. Once drugs work their way into the routine, substance abuse and addiction quickly follow. Even if they know that the drug is dangerous for them, they feel a need to stick to their routine. This circle can quickly lead to overdose.
Lastly, some people try to self-medicate when they have OCD. They find that drugs provide some relief. However, this relief doesn’t last like obsessive compulsive disorder treatment. As a result, they have to continue abusing drugs to get the relief that they crave. This behavior leads to addiction and potentially overdose.
We Can Help You With Addiction and Underlying Disorders
Do you need Pennsylvania addiction recovery services that also address underlying mental disorders? Consider visiting Steps to Recovery for treatment. We provide reliable addiction treatment while addressing underlying issues. Some of the programs that we offer include:
12-step rehab
Dual diagnosis treatment
Gender-specific rehab
Residential treatment
Sober living
Outpatient rehab
Addiction interventions
Don’t wait to get the help that you need to overcome substance use or another mental condition. Learn more about the connection between OCD and addiction. Reach out to us today at 866-488-8684 for more information.
The post The Connection Between OCD and Addiction appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

Most Addictive Drugs [Infographic]

The United States is in the midst of a drug abuse crisis. Every day, more and more people try addictive substances for the first time. Sadly, every day, more and more people lose their lives to substance abuse-related overdoses. Understanding the prevalence and dangers of the most addictive drugs in the country can help protect you and those you love from their dangerous effects.
Alcohol Addiction
Alcohol is the most commonly abused substance in the country. Due to its legality and popularity in media, many people aren’t aware of its effects or that it’s one of the most addictive drugs in the world. Every year, thousands of individuals develop alcohol use disorders without even realizing it.
Alcohol addiction, or alcoholism, affects all aspects of a person’s life. They may begin to perform poorly at work or school, develop financial problems, or withdraw from loved ones. If a person who struggles with alcoholism doesn’t receive the treatment they need, they may develop serious health problems, such as liver failure or brain damage.
Heroin, Narcotics, and Other Opioids
Recently, the United States government announced that the country is in the middle of an opioid epidemic. This means that the number of people using prescription painkillers, heroin, and other opiates is skyrocketing. Furthermore, the population of people who struggle with opioid addiction far outweighs those who are in opioid addiction treatment facilities, leading to thousands of opioid-related deaths every year.
This epidemic developed due to the increase in painkiller prescriptions. More than ever, Americans began relying on prescription painkillers to manage symptoms of chronic pain. However, they didn’t realize that prescription opioids are some of the most addictive drugs on the market. As citizens’ dependencies to narcotics grew, they began moving onto stronger opiates, such as heroin.
The growth of heroin addiction in the United States is a direct result of the overprescription of opioid painkillers. Additionally, due to the extremely uncomfortable symptoms of opiate detox and withdrawal, many Americans never find the help they need.
Students and Stimulant Abuse
Unlike other substances, stimulant abuse and addiction affect a disproportionately young population. Unfortunately, these substances are also some of the most addictive drugs available. Many students abuse cocaine and stimulants in order to perform better in school or stay up late for parties. Adderall, a common prescription stimulant that individuals use to treat ADHD, is a popular substance among students.
Additionally, students often abuse a mix of prescription substances to help them perform academically or socially. Xanax, a prescription used to treat anxiety, is another common substance among students. Its calming effects often help students sleep or unwind after a stressful week.
However, Adderall and Xanax aren’t as harmless as many young people believe. Just because doctors prescribe them doesn’t mean that they’re safe for recreational use. In fact, they can be some of the most addictive drugs available to young adults. Without realizing it, many students become dependent on these substances that eventually evolve into Adderall or Xanax addiction problems.
Beat the Most Addictive Drugs at Steps to Recovery
Don’t let the most addictive drugs in the United States claim the life of someone you love. Steps to Recovery offers comprehensive substance addiction treatment for those battling addiction to these illicit substances. To learn about our program options, call Steps to Recovery now at 866-488-8684.
The post Most Addictive Drugs [Infographic] appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

The Symptoms of Severe Depression

Many mental disorders can spur from the development of substance use disorder. One example is severe depression. People who suffer from this disorder often turn to drugs to lessen the symptoms of severe depression. To fully understand the dangers that this condition poses, you have to learn more about it.
What Is Depression?
Depression is a type of mood disorder that can affect people’s thoughts, feelings and moods. In general, it touches every aspect of their lives. It isn’t a type of character flaw or weakness. Instead, it’s a chemical imbalance in the brain that requires medical attention.
Severe depression takes this disorder to the next level. People who suffer from severe cases might experience depressive episodes for long periods of time. In some cases, the episodes are so intense that they have thoughts of suicide.
What Are Some Symptoms of Severe Depression?
Everyone who has severe depression experiences it in different ways. As a result, the symptoms of severe depression vary from person to person. With that said, most people suffer from fairly common symptoms at one point or another. These include:
Irritability
Hopelessness
Ongoing thoughts that something terrible will happen
Excessive sleeping
Insomnia
Lost interest in hobbies and friends
Some of these symptoms of severe depression contradict themselves. That alone demonstrates why not everyone experiences this disorder in the same way. For example, people don’t usually suffer from excessive sleeping and insomnia at the same time.
In some cases, severe depression becomes so bad that people have psychotic symptoms. For instance, they might have delusions or hallucinations. While these are uncommon in those with normal depression, they become more common in cases of severe depression.
Not All Depression Is the Same
Keep in mind that not all cases of depression are the same. In fact, it’s pretty typical for people to experience some form of depression from time to time. It’s a normal human emotion after all.
However, there are some cases in which depression becomes extreme. When it interferes with people’s daily lives or causes thoughts of suicide, it’s important to get help. People who don’t are more likely to self-medicate their problems with drugs. Ongoing self-medication can lead to dependence and addiction, which make treatment more complex.
Let Us Help You With Severe Depression
At Steps to Recovery, we don’t just help people overcome addiction. Our Pennsylvania addiction recovery services also include treatment for underlying mental problems. That’s why we offer depression treatment. Some of the other services and programs that we provide include:
Family therapy
Intensive outpatient rehab
Partial hospitalization program
Dual diagnosis treatment
Group therapy
Individual therapy
Learn more about the symptoms of severe depression. Don’t let underlying mental disorders keep you from overcoming addiction. Reach out to us today at 866-488-8684.
The post The Symptoms of Severe Depression appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

Helping a Loved One with Alcohol Poisoning

It’s common for people to enjoy a drink or two when they go out with friends. However, if they don’t watch how much that they drink, they might end up with alcohol poisoning. Alcohol poisoning symptoms are extreme and can sometimes lead to death. Because of how dangerous this can be, it’s important to understand how to help a loved one.
What Is Alcohol Poisoning?
Alcohol poisoning is a serious problem that occurs when people drink copious amounts of alcohol within a short amount of time. In some cases, they can die as a result of alcohol poisoning. However, no set amount brings about this sometimes fatal condition. Everyone’s body is different, so what causes poisoning in one person might not produce it in another.
Alcohol Poisoning Symptoms
Knowing alcohol poisoning symptoms is crucial in making sure that people get help promptly. The more signs that others know to look out for, the better that they can recognize those who need alcoholism treatment. Some of these symptoms include:
Seizures
Slow breathing
Confusion
Low body temperature
Passing out
Vomiting
Irregular breathing
How You Can Help
In any instance of alcohol poisoning, seek out medical attention from a professional immediately.
In cases where the individual is still responsive and conscious, keep them on their side and never let them lay on their back. Never give them any food, medicine, or drink as this could be dangerous and cause further issue. Before touching the individual, tell them what you will do in a calm and low voice. If they are too hot, cool them off and move them from the sun. If too cold, warm them with a blanket.
Never leave the individual and constantly check to see if they are still responsive and conscious. If the individual becomes unconscious, keep them on their side and be ready to administer CPR if necessary.
Once your loved one is safe from harm, it’s time to talk to them about seeking out professional help for their alcohol abuse.
We Want to Help
When you look for Pennsylvania addiction recovery services, consider Steps to Recovery. We help people overcome addiction to many drugs, including alcohol. Our team creates customized treatment plans that address the needs of each client. Some of our programs include:
Family therapy
Dual diagnosis treatment
Gender-specific rehab
Individual and group therapies
Intensive outpatient rehab
Trauma therapy
Don’t let your loved one fall victim to alcohol poisoning. Learn how to identify the symptoms and help them find the care they need. Reach out to Steps to Recovery today and call 866-488-8684.
The post Helping a Loved One with Alcohol Poisoning appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more