Does Alcohol Kill Brain Cells?

Alcoholism is a very deadly disease that’s killing tens of thousands of people each year in our country. Due to the massive opioid epidemic, many people are no longer focusing on the dangers of alcoholism. A common question people ask when discussing alcoholism is, “Does alcohol kill brain cells?” And this is a question that neuroscience can help answer.
Can Science Answer – Does Alcohol Kill Brain Cells?
Growing up, you probably heard time and time again never to smoke, drink, or do drugs because it will kill your brain cells. In a technical sense, this is just a myth. But, what we need to understand is that while your brain cells aren’t technically dead, you’re still severely harming your brain.
What the latest studies in neuroscience show us is that alcoholism affects the synapses in the brain. Synapses are the way that brain cells wire together to help us function as people. Long-term alcohol abuse causes specific synapses to change in a way that can cause serious harm. In this case, think of synapses as something that forms your habits and behaviors.
Understanding the Habit Loop
Brains are designed to help you go towards pleasure and try to avert pain whenever possible. A lot of this happens in the limbic system of the brain, which is the home of our reward system. When you begin turning to alcohol as a way to receive pleasure and avoid pain, you develop an addiction. The following is how the brain starts to rewire itself, which is known as the habit loop:
Trigger
Behavior
Reward
For example, if you drink every day after work to alleviate the stress of the day, you’re changing your synapses. The brain sees stress as a trigger and something that you don’t want. The behavior is drinking, and the reward you receive is alleviating some of your anxiety and worry. This cycle changes the wiring of the brain, making you turn to alcohol every time you experience this trigger.
Why you Need Addiction Treatment through Steps to Recovery
Unfortunately, there comes a time where alcohol is no longer alleviating your stress, but it’s creating more. It can also make you anxious, depressed and cause a variety of other problems in your life. Drug and alcohol treatment services Scranton offers can help you to overcome your addiction. Through the treatment process, you’ll learn how to rewire your brain to regain control of your life.
Steps to Recovery provides an addiction treatment program to people in the Scranton and surrounding areas. Our beautiful Levittown, PA location creates a welcoming and peaceful environment for our clients. Removing yourself from the stress and triggers of your daily life allows you to focus on yourself and your recovery.
Some of the therapeutic services we offer include:
Group therapy
DBT
Psychotherapy
So, does alcohol kill brain cells? No. But can it create irreversible damage to the brain? Absolutely. Let Steps to Recovery help you prevent this damage and begin living a healthy, full life. Call us today at 866-488-8684 to learn about our addiction recovery services.
The post Does Alcohol Kill Brain Cells? appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

Crystal Meth Withdrawal Symptoms

Drug withdrawal is one of the leading reasons as to why people relapse when they’re trying to get clean. If you’re someone who has an addiction to meth, you may already know this to be true from your experience. Crystal meth withdrawal symptoms can make it almost impossible to stay clean. Because the symptoms are so uncomfortable, users tend to return to crystal meth rather quickly to stop their pain. Going through a qualified treatment program can help you through detox and increase your chances of remaining clean.
What are Some Crystal Meth Withdrawal Symptoms
Withdrawal happens to you when you develop a dependence to any type of substance you use regularly or in excess. The mind and body need the substance to maintain balance and operate correctly. Once you stop using a drug like crystal meth, your brain begins to misfire, and your body has a wide range of symptoms too. When it comes to meth, most of the symptoms of withdrawal are psychological.
Some of the symptoms include:
Anxiety
Depression
Insomnia
Irritability
The symptoms of withdrawal from meth can also include some dangerous physical symptoms as well. While your body is trying to adjust from no longer having the drug in your system, it can put your heart under a lot of pressure. This means that it’s possible for your heart rate and blood pressure to be at an unsafe level during withdrawal. To have a safe, comfortable detox, you should seek the help of an addiction treatment program.
Managing Crystal Meth Withdrawal Symptoms
If you’re struggling with methamphetamine addiction and want to regain control of your life, detox and treatment can help. When you go to a professional facility that specializes in drug detox, you will have all the help you need. The on-site medical staff will be there to help reduce your symptoms as much as possible through different methods. This will assure you that you’ll not only be comfortable, but you’ll also be safe.
Staying Clean with Steps to Recovery
A great way to stay clean after detox is to do whatever it takes to never go back to drugs like meth again. To do so, it’s essential to go through the entire rehabilitation process to learn a new way of living. Part of the treatment is receiving alcohol drug education, so you grasp the disease of addiction. Once you understand how your addiction works, you’re in an excellent position to overcome it.
Steps to Recovery is an addiction treatment facility that offers detox as well as addiction treatment. We want to provide you with the knowledge and tools that you need to live a happy, sober life. Our goal is to see you leave treatment with the confidence that you never have to use drugs again if you don’t want to. Some of the programs that we offer here at Steps to Recovery include:
Family counseling
Group therapy
DBT
Learning about crystal meth withdrawal symptoms is just the first step to finding lasting recovery. Reach out to Steps to Recovery today at 866-488-8684 to learn about our services. Don’t let crystal meth ruin your life for one more day and find help now.
The post Crystal Meth Withdrawal Symptoms appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

PTSD and Addiction: Is There a Connection?

There’s a major stigma that surrounds addiction because many people believe it to be a choice. While it’s a choice to pick up a drink or a drug in most cases, many people also struggle with mental health issues. For many people abusing substances, PTSD and addiction go hand-in-hand. You might be someone who suffered a traumatic experience and turning to drugs or alcohol was the only way you knew how to cope. Unfortunately, long-term substance abuse can make your life even more unmanageable.
How PTSD and Addiction Occur
Although picking up a drink or a drug is a choice, most traumatic experiences that happen are not. Many people who struggle with PTSD and addiction had something happen to them at a very young age. You can experience a trigger affecting your PTSD at any time. These triggers are why some individuals turn to alcohol or drugs. The more your brain associates symptoms of PTSD with drinking or using, the higher the risk of addiction.
The three reasons people use include:
To achieve a feeling or emotion
To get rid of an emotion or feeling
To have an escape
For most people who struggle with PTSD, they’re using or drinking to get rid of a feeling or have an escape. When symptoms of PTSD happen, your brain can get stuck in rumination replaying past events. As you already know, this is a short-term fix for a massive long-term problem. This band-aid is why addiction therapy services are so essential to get your life back on track.
Overcoming PTSD and Addiction
The great news is that there are a lot of people who were once in your same position and have since recovered. It’s possible to recover from both PTSD as well as addiction, and it all starts with addiction recovery services. At a qualified, dual diagnosis treatment center, you’ll receive the proper care to recover. You’ll be in a safe environment where you can open up about your trauma and learn how to work through it.
One of the methods used in treatment is trauma-focused CBT, which is evidence-based treatment. This means that science has proven that this method works when treating people with traumas. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is about identifying your triggers, thoughts, and emotions and learning a new way to cope. This method helps to rewire the way you behave after trauma responses. Soon, you’ll be able to find healthy behaviors that no longer involve getting drunk or high.
Dual Diagnosis Treatment at Steps to Recovery
Steps to Recovery offers addiction treatment while also focusing on your symptoms of PTSD. This is extremely important because if the focus were only on addiction or PTSD, your chances of recovery would be much lower. By working on your addiction and PTSD at the same time, you’ll learn tools that’ll help you stay sober for years to come. It can be challenging to open up about your trauma in front of others, but you’ll quickly find that you’re not alone in your struggles.
At our facility, we offer:
DBT
Family counseling
Psychotherapy
If you need help with addiction and PTSD, reach out to Steps to Recovery. Let us help you regain control of your life. Call today at 866-488-8684 to learn about possible programs and treatment options.
The post PTSD and Addiction: Is There a Connection? appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

Codependency and Addiction: Knowing the Connection

Codependency and addiction often go hand-in-hand, and it prevents the person suffering from getting help. There’s a very fine line between helping someone that you care about and enabling their behavior. While generosity is an excellent quality that makes the world a better place, helping support those with an addiction can hurt both people involved. You’re about to learn about how your codependent nature may be keeping you as well as your loved one sick.
What are Codependency and Addiction?
Codependency means you have an excessive emotional relationship with someone who has an addiction. Being a codependent can be extremely difficult to acknowledge in the same way as an addiction to drugs or alcohol. Often, codependents get defensive because his or her mind says that they’re just helping the person. The reality is that if you’re in a codependent relationship with someone with an addiction, both of you are suffering.
To help yourself and help the person with an addiction, you need to get honest with yourself about the situation. You need to take a step back and ask if what you’re doing is helping the person or holding them back from recovery. Some of the critical signs of codependent behaviors that you should look for include:
Making extreme sacrifices for the other person
Finding it difficult to ever say no to the person
Covering up his or her addiction to others
Worrying about others’ opinions of you
Staying quiet to avoid arguments
Stopping Codependency and Addiction with Steps to Recovery
Most people who are struggling with addiction would be unable to continue if it weren’t for a codependent relationship. There are far too many people out there who have lost a loved one to addiction due to the enabling. If you want to help the person you love to succeed in life, it involves setting up boundaries. In most cases, you need to cut the person of financially as well as emotionally for him or her to get help.
To those with codependent traits, this sounds like a ridiculous thing to do, but it’s what works. In some cases, your codependent may be such a problem that you need help as well. If you’re struggling to break ties and have your loved one get help, you may need to get support. The support you need can come in the form of your friends, family as well as a licensed therapist.
Overcoming your codependent nature can be the best thing to happen for you and your loved one. Once your loved one is ready for treatment, Steps to Recovery provides addiction help for families. Not only do we help those with an addiction, but we’re here to help you too. We want to ensure that after your loved one gets help, you’re able to break free from your codependent behaviors. This will help you have a healthy relationship with yourself as well as others.
Some of our programs include:
Family therapy
Group therapy
CBT
To learn more about codependency and addiction and how to stop the cycle, reach out to Steps to Recovery today. Call now at 866-488-8684 to learn about programs and services.
The post Codependency and Addiction: Knowing the Connection appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

Is Alcohol a Stimulant?

Currently, the country is focusing on the current drug crisis taking place. However, this opioid focus is allowing people to ignore the dangers of alcohol abuse. Because alcohol is a legal substance, many don’t tend to worry about how much and how often they consume a drink. What many fail to realize is that alcohol is still one of the leading causes of death in America. When you focus on the dangers of alcoholism, several questions may arise. How much is too much? Is alcohol a stimulant? How can I stop drinking?
Stimulant or Depressant-How to Tell the Difference
Before you ask, is alcohol a stimulant, you must have an understanding of what a stimulant is. You should also know about depressants as well. The most significant difference between the two substances is that a stimulant will speed up the functions of your body while a depressant will slow them.
Stimulants will make an individual more alert and awake. They’ll also feel an increase in their energy levels and feel more attentive. Depressants are typically anti-anxiety and sleep aid medications. These substances have a slowing effect on the central nervous system, allowing the body to calm itself down.
So, Is Alcohol a Stimulant?
The simple answer is no. Alcohol is actually a depressant. It works like a depressant medication by suppressing the release of the brain chemicals that increase energy and activity. However, it’s often thought to be a stimulant because of how it enhances the release of dopamine. The excess of this chemical will make an individual believe they have more energy while, in reality, the nervous system is left unaffected by the alcohol.
Overcoming Alcoholism
If you feel that you have a problem with alcohol, a drug alcohol detox is the best place for you. One reason people don’t try to get sober from alcohol is the problematic withdrawal. The good news is that significant advancements in addiction medicine can help your alcohol detox. This help will help minimize all of the following symptoms you can have from withdrawal:
Nausea
Anxiety
Body tremors
Insomnia
Hallucinations
Another reason you should always get professional help for detox is that the symptoms can be dangerous. Some people withdrawing from alcohol can have a life-threatening seizure. During withdrawal, there’s also a lot of pressure on the heart, so cardiac arrest is a possibility. At a medical detox facility, you can rest assured that you’ll be safe as well as comfortable.
Help with Steps to Recovery
Steps to Recovery is here to help by providing you with all of the addiction recovery services you need. Not only do we offer detox, but we also offer treatment that will help you stay sober once you leave. We want you to feel confident about your recovery by the time you discharge. We help you do this by providing you with some of the following therapeutic methods:
Family therapy
Group therapy
Psychotherapy
Is alcohol a stimulant? No, but it’s still dangerous when addiction is present. For help with alcohol or drug abuse or addiction, turn to Steps to Recovery. Call today at 866-488-8684 to learn about available options for treatment.
The post Is Alcohol a Stimulant? appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

Depression and Alcohol Abuse: What’s the Connection

If you look at ads that promote different alcohol brands, you might conclude that drinking leads to all sorts of happy outcomes. It may be surprising to learn; however, there’s more of a link between depression and alcohol abuse. Alcohol is a depressant, meaning it slows down the body. It also increases the likelihood of feeling depressed. While it’s not always clear which comes first — problem drinking or depression — what is clear is that the two are connected.
The Connection Between Depression and Alcohol Abuse
Some people start out with a form of depression, whether it’s a mild case of Seasonal Affective Disorder or a more serious one, such as major depressive disorder. A constant feeling of listlessness may lead them to abuse alcohol, in hopes of escaping negative thoughts. The more they drink, the more depressed they become.
Other people don’t start out with depression, but they drink heavily. As their dependence on alcohol grows, they begin feeling down more often than not. Long-term alcohol abuse changes the brain’s chemistry. Not only are they more likely to suffer depression, but they’re also unable to curb their drinking.
Depression often involves persistent feelings of sadness, worthlessness, and guilt. Depressed people feel tired a lot and have trouble concentrating.
Instead of seeking depression treatment, they drink more and more. Their depression and alcohol abuse increase together.
A Vicious Cycle
Once someone gets caught up in the cycle of drinking more and feeling down, it’s hard to break out of it. A person may not realize that instead of making themselves feel better, alcohol abuse contributes to their depression. Also, as alcohol dependency grows, so does the severity of the depression.
Signs that someone has a drinking problem include:
Constantly craving alcohol
Continuing to drink, despite suffering job and family problems
Withdrawing from activities that don’t involve drinking
Being unable to cut back on drinking
Without treatment for alcohol abuse, a person can develop an addiction and alcoholism. They may require dual diagnosis treatment to deal with both the alcohol addiction and their mental health disorder of depression.
If this sounds like you or someone you care about, it’s not too late to get help. The first step is saying that you need it.
Collaborative Treatment for Sustainable Recovery
Steps to Recovery is a rehab treatment center in Levittown, Pennsylvania. In our supportive and collaborative facility, we encourage clients and their families as they work to overcome drug and alcohol addiction. We maintain an intimate, comfortable environment with a small staff-to-client ratio to ensure personalized care.
Our addiction recovery services include:
Alcohol addiction rehab program
Drug addiction rehab program
Intensive outpatient program (IOP)
Outpatient treatment program
Sober living program
If you believe you are suffering from depression and alcohol abuse, reach out to Steps to Recovery. Call today at 866-488-8684 to learn about your options.
The post Depression and Alcohol Abuse: What’s the Connection appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

Common Types of Group Therapy

Therapy is an integral part of any rehab program. Experts agree that it helps people deal with the cause of their addiction. When it comes to therapy, one of the most helpful types is group counseling. What most people don’t know, however, is that there are several types of group therapy.
What Is Group Therapy?
Group counseling is a type of therapy that takes place in a group setting. A licensed therapist or clinical professional will lead the group discussion.
Choosing group therapy offers a range of benefits. In general, it gives people the ability to explore issues in a safe atmosphere. Studies show that people feel better when they share their problems in a peer-supported environment.
Types of Group Therapy
The most significant misconception is that group counseling is a single type of therapy. However, it’s an umbrella term that includes several types of group therapy. Below is a closer look at the most common counseling methods that fall under this umbrella.
Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy
Cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBGT) is a technique that therapists use to modify people’s behaviors. It works much like traditional cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), but it occurs in a group setting. Just like CBT, CBGT works well for people of all ages and genders.
During CBGT, people learn how to deal with and replace their negative thoughts and emotions. Replacing them with positive ones can help people kick bad habits such as addiction. During CBGT, people participate in activities that include group assignments and exercises.
CBGT helps people set long-term sobriety goals and form support networks. As far as addiction recovery services go, CBGT is one of the essential types of therapy that people can get.
Family Therapy
Group therapy doesn’t always involve fellow peers. Sometimes it includes family members. Family therapy is one of the most crucial addiction therapy services during rehab. In fact, many underlying problems that lead to addiction start in the household.
Family therapy gives therapists a chance to meet with an entire family. Seeing how the members interact with each other can bring specific problems to light. Through family counseling, families can rebuild lines of communication and work on mending their relationships.
We Can Provide the Group Therapy That You Need
Do you or a loved one struggle with addiction? If so, group therapy might provide the help that you need to beat your addiction once and for all. At Steps to Recovery, we offer addiction recovery group services. Some of our other programs and services include:
Intensive outpatient rehab
CBT
Family therapy
Individual therapy
12-step rehab
Don’t let your addiction control you any longer. Let us show you how different types of group therapy can help you overcome addiction. Reach out to us today for aid at 866-488-8684.
The post Common Types of Group Therapy appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

Top Signs of Pain Pill Abuse

Every day, millions of Americans take prescription drugs to deal with a host of issues. Pain pills help many people, but they’re also one of the most abused licit substances. Are you worried that someone you care about has a problem with painkillers? Learn to identify common signs of pain pill abuse so that you can provide the help your loved one needs.
Signs of Pain Pill Abuse: What to Look For
You might not realize right away that someone you know abuses painkillers. Signs aren’t always visible, and many people continue working or caring for their families without detection.
Maybe you don’t notice significant behavioral changes, so other signs of pain pill abuse to look for include:
More refills/empty bottles than expected: Does it seem like your loved one is going through prescription pills more quickly than they should? Are you finding empty bottles in the trash, although they were full just days ago?
Financial problems: As a person uses more resources to secure drugs, they’ll have less to handle their responsibilities, like paying bills.
Theft: Along with needing money to feed their habit, someone with an addiction may resort to stealing from family members.
Mood changes: Does it seem like your family member is up one minute and down the next? Are they always irritable or angry?
Drowsiness: Someone with a pill addiction may nod off at any time, and they’ll tire quickly.
Changes in sleep patterns: Excessive sleep may indicate a problem, as well as periods of frantic wakefulness.
When you’re close to someone, you can usually tell if something is “off.” Even if they tell you they don’t need drug and alcohol rehab, trust your instincts if your gut says something is wrong.
Encouraging a Loved One to Get Help
It’s never easy knowing that a loved one is going through difficulties. You want to help, but they have to recognize they need treatment.
Let them know you care about them and want to see them get well. Be supportive and encourage your loved one to enter rehab for their own sake. Avoid enabling behaviors as much as possible.
Hopefully, with the right encouragement, they’ll take the big step toward getting treatment.
Start Your Recovery in Our Healing Environment
At Steps to Recovery in Levittown, Pennsylvania, you or a loved one can start making positive changes to overcome drug and alcohol addiction. We provide Intensive Outpatient and Partial Hospitalization programs, as well as outpatient services. Our facility has developed a strong reputation for fostering integrity and honesty in our customized approach to treatment.
The addiction recovery services we offer include:
Prescription drug addiction rehab
Drug addiction rehab programs
Dual diagnosis treatment
Family therapy
Group therapy
Drug and alcohol addiction doesn’t have to be a barrier to a bright future. If you see signs of pain pill abuse, call Steps to Recovery today at 866-488-8684.
The post Top Signs of Pain Pill Abuse appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

Top Causes of Teen Drug Use

Why do teens use drugs? Unfortunately, there’s no single reason. Instead, many problems and situations lead teens in the direction of substance abuse. Below is a look at the top causes of teen drug use.
Parents’ Behavior and Teen Drug Use
Whether or not parents like to admit it, their kids pick up on their behaviors. As a result, teens who grow up with parents who abuse drugs are more likely to do so themselves. Likewise, teens who grow up in drug-free homes are more likely never to use substances.
However, living in drug-free homes doesn’t always mean that teens will remain drug-free. Many other factors can contribute to teens using drugs. Similarly, just because parents use substances doesn’t mean their teens will. In some cases, teens admit to not using drugs to avoid ruining their lives as their parents did.
Peer Pressure and Teen Drug Use
Peer pressure remains one of the top reasons why teens turn to drugs. Experts say that it can get to anyone regardless of the stage of life they’re in. With that said, teens are far more susceptible than adults. The main reason is that they haven’t developed their own identities yet.
At the moment, teens feel like it’s easier to take drugs than to tell their friends “no.” Saying no can lead to judgment and humiliation from peers. As teens get older, they learn how to stand up for themselves. During their adolescent years, however, peer pressure gets the best of them.
Trying Drugs Out of Curiosity
Sometimes, other people don’t influence teens to do drugs. Pure curiosity leads them to try substances instead. They hear that drugs can make them feel good but that they shouldn’t take them. These mixed signals lead to curiosity, which leads to substance use.
Most teens tell themselves that they want to get high just once. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work out that way. Once they get a taste for drugs, they often continue to abuse the substances. In fact, some teens develop an addiction after their first use.
Get Help for Teen Drug Addiction
Does your teen struggle with substance abuse? If so, it’s important to know that teenage drug abuse doesn’t go away on its own. Parents have to seek help for their teens to set them down the right path. At Steps to Recovery, we offer addiction recovery services such as:
Outpatient rehab
Partial hospitalization program
Intensive outpatient rehab
Family therapy
Dual diagnosis treatment
Don’t let teen drug use ruin your child’s life. Find out what you can do to put his or her life back on track. Reach out to us today at 866-488-8684 to learn more about what we can do to help.
The post Top Causes of Teen Drug Use appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more

Cocaine Use Statistics [Infographic]

The United States has found itself in a battle against drug use for decades now. Currently, the primary focus is heroin and opioids. However, it’s crucial that other illicit substances should remain in the headlines as well. Cocaine is still a prominent drug in use today and requires attention to help remove it from our streets. Cocaine use statistics are still on the rise, rather than falling.
All About Cocaine
Before you focus on cocaine use statistics, it’s essential that you understand what cocaine is. An understanding of the drug will only emphasize the magnitude of these statistics. Cocaine is a potent stimulant that has a high risk of addiction after use. The drug comes from a chemical found in the coca leaves in South America. During the beginning of the 1900s, the compound was in tonics for medicinal purposes. After research, scientists found that cocaine is harmful, leading to a change in the manufacturing of medications.
Cocaine Use Statistics
While cocaine is a popular drug across the world, it’s most popular in the United States. Those within America spend a collective $28 billion on cocaine, making it the leading consumer in the world. In fact, one out of every twenty Americans between the age of 18 to 25 uses the drug. From 2013 until 2015, the number of younger Americans choosing to use cocaine lept 61%. In 2015 alone, 968,000 Americans tried cocaine. This jump explains why the number of overdose deaths in the year 2015 was at their highest since 2006, and second highest since 1999. While this gap shows that at one point cocaine use had begun to slow, the latest jumps show an upswing in popularity once more.
Steps to Recovery and Cocaine Rehab
If you or a loved one have begun to contribute to these cocaine use statistics, the time to find help is now. Cocaine addiction isn’t a condition that you can beat alone. A professional cocaine addiction rehab center can help individuals regain control of their life. Steps to Recovery offers treatment for numerous addictions, including:
Cocaine addiction
Meth addiction
Heroin addiction
Prescription drug addiction
We also offer several programs that aid in recovery, including:
Drug and alcohol detox
Residential rehab
Intensive outpatient program
Outpatient program
Partial hospitalization program
If you want to stop being part of the cocaine use statistics, reach out for help today. Call Steps to Recovery now at 866-488-8684 to learn about treatment options and more about alcohol and drug education. Let us help you make that first step towards lasting recovery.
The post Cocaine Use Statistics [Infographic] appeared first on Steps to Recovery.


Read more