Knowing the Addiction Definition Does Not Guarantee Sobriety

Our minds have an amazing capacity to realize a fact but still not accept it and take it to heart. Many individuals who struggle with addiction may know deep down that they have a problem. They may know the “addiction definition,” but this doesn’t mean that they are ready to admit it out loud to themselves or to others.
In a scenario like this, the individual knows that a problem could exist, but they attempt to protect themselves from the guilt and pain of acceptance by ignoring the substance problem. They aren’t prepared to realize it fully or do anything about it.
In fact, even if an individual does end up seeking halfhearted help, it’s important to note that this will not guarantee success in rehab treatment and through sobriety. As with many things, success hinges more on your mindset than on anything else.
Working With a Positive Mindset to Treat Addiction
A positive mindset affects addiction a great deal. For example, if someone who is struggling with substance abuse knows the addiction definition but has the mindset that addiction only happens to weak and stupid people, they will be much less likely to put themselves in that camp and admit that they may be too weak and stupid.
Of course, we know that those who struggle with addiction are not weak nor are they stupid. It’s a disease. It’s just that most individuals don’t see it this way, and that holds them back.
They may see that something is amiss or that they’d like to slow down their drug use. But they avoid thinking about the fact that they are actually struggling. This protects them from that full-blown realization and all the work that would go into fixing it. It is definitely scary.
Dealing With Denial of Addiction Definition
A common question that is asked when determining whether or not someone is truly struggling with an addiction is could you stop if you wanted to?
Even though most patients who know their addiction definition would initially answer yes to this question, the truth is that the majority of those individuals probably could not stop “if they wanted to.” Of course, this is the mindset known as denial, and it’s what’s responsible for hundreds of thousands of individuals who desperately need addiction treatment not seeking the help that would save them, or not giving it their full effort.
Therapy at Steps to Recovery
Therapy is where mindset changing happens. Steps to Recovery offer multiple types of therapy that will help you treat your addiction head-on. These include:
Individual therapy
12-Step program meetings with members from the fellowship
Group therapy sessions
Family therapy
Therapy that focuses on preventing relapse
Contact Steps to Recovery
Recovery from addiction is possible. Part of it starts with admitting that you have a problem, however.
This isn’t easy, but it’s much more necessary than simply knowing the addiction definition. That will not guarantee your sobriety. Instead, you need to take action. To get in contact with us and examine your outpatient addiction treatment options, call Steps to Recovery at 866.488.8684 today.
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The Answer to Is Addiction a Disease?

Addiction is a disease. But unfortunately, many people are under the misinformation that it is a moral failing—a choice that could have been prevented if only the individual had exercised their willpower more often and made better choices. This is not the case at all. If you’ve ever found yourself wondering, “Is addiction a disease?” it is one, and you’re not alone in your confusion.
Why Is Addiction a Disease
Most full-blown diseases like diabetes and heart disease do not continually need to be defined as diseases. After all, it is widely accepted that these illnesses are legitimate diseases that shouldn’t be blamed on the individual.
Addiction, however, is different. Time and again, those who treat addiction and addicted individuals and their family members themselves are forced to reiterate that addiction is indeed a disease. It’s like an uphill battle with these people, who would rather assume the worst in others.
And to be sure if you’ve never struggled with addictive cravings yourself, you likely can’t see why someone could have a hard time with this. But the fact is that despite the serious social and health consequences, those who are addicted to drugs or alcohol continue to compulsively take these illicit substances.
They are fully aware that they are doing something that is directly detrimental to their well-being, but they continue. This is uncontrollable behavior at its worst.
Recovering From Addiction With Steps to Recovery
Steps to Recovery treats addiction as a disease. If you’ve ever wondered, “Is addiction a disease?” We can help. Our facilities can accommodate any type of addiction. We help those addicted to alcohol, cocaine, heroin, prescription painkillers, meth and other damaging substances.
At Steps to Recovery, to use a unique two-phase program to treat our clients. These phases include services, such as:
Individualized therapy
Family counseling
Group therapy discussions
Basic life skills and sobriety goal setting
Lessons on tools for integrating back into society
Contact Us Today
If you are ready to admit that you may be struggling with the disease of addiction, you absolutely must seek professional help at an addiction treatment center. Steps to Recovery has already helped hundreds of individuals stop using drugs like cocaine, meth, and alcohol.
To begin your own path toward recovery, call Steps to Recovery at 866.488.8684. We welcome phone calls from individuals directly struggling with an addiction problem We also take calls from family members concerned about their loved ones. No one needs to continue struggling with addiction and spiraling out of control with drugs or alcohol.
Never wonder, “Is addiction a disease?” again. It is a serious disease, but you can stop it in its tracks. It’s never too late to seek treatment for addiction. Call Steps to Recovery today to learn about your options at recovery and life.
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I Think I’m Going Through Marijuana Withdrawal

With all drugs, when an individual has been using and abusing one regularly and for a long period of time, abruptly stopping the use of that substance will cause withdrawal symptoms. This is no different for marijuana, and marijuana withdrawal is a surprisingly common occurrence.
It’s important to note that marijuana withdrawal is not as serious or dangerous as withdrawal from other drugs like heroin or alcohol. But there are still symptoms that accompany it, which is why it’s important to seek professional help for detox.
Detoxing From Marijuana
If you are a chronic user of marijuana, stopping its use all of the sudden will not be a breeze even though many people suspect it will be. Monitored detox is necessary to help you safely and comfortably stop using marijuana. It’s also important to note that many individuals who abuse marijuana on a regular basis also abuse other drugs, such as alcohol or benzodiazepines. These co-occurring addictions can complicate the withdrawal symptoms that may accompany a marijuana detox.
Reasons for Choosing a Detox Program for Marijuana Abuse
Marijuana is an outlier among drugs. That’s because like alcohol, it often benefits from the viewpoint that it is rather harmless. It is even legal in several states.
The fact is that marijuana is not harmless. Aside from it being a “gateway drug” to other, more serious and harmful drugs, marijuana has also been associated with brain damage to young people who do not yet have fully developed adult brains.
Furthermore, recent studies by brain scientists have uncovered that many young people’s brains do not fully develop until the age of 21. This means that young people who are using marijuana on a regular basis may be damaging their brains in irreversible ways before they get the chance to fully develop.
Finally, marijuana use on a regular basis has also been associated with overall laziness and lethargy. Because it sedates users and makes them feel calm and relaxed, useful stress and motivation that is otherwise present to help spur individuals to be successful in their lives and endeavors are lost.
How to Handle Marijuana Withdrawal
If you feel like you are going through marijuana withdrawal right now, it’s time to seek professional help. A reputable drug rehab center like Steps to Recovery. We can connect you with a detox program that will medically monitor you for signs of withdrawal during your detox. A monitored detox means that you’ll never have to worry about feeling exceptionally uncomfortable or in pain. At Steps to Recovery, we have numerous services, including:
Connections to detox centers
Group and individual therapy
Family involvement
Flexible, individualized programs
A unique two-phase program for recovery
To begin your treatment plan, call 866.488.8684 today. One of our addiction specialists can speak with you right away.
Remember–it’s never too late to get what you want out of life without having to wade through the many issues that accompany marijuana addiction. Get in touch with Steps to Recovery today for professional and compassionate help with addiction.
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You Need Drug Detox to Get Free from Addiction

After a significant amount of time abusing drugs and/or alcohol, there’s good chance your addiction has become deeply rooted in your body and mind. By the time you are ready to admit defeat and seek help, you are facing the prospects of needing a stint in a drug detox facility.
The Importance of Drug Detox
Dealing with an addiction is a difficult process. When faced with treatment, it’s best done with a clear mind and body. That’s not easy to do if you are still dealing with the residual drugs and/or alcohol left in your system. In order to facilitate the best treatment possible, it’s necessary for you to do whatever you can to clear your system. That usually entails a stint in drug detox.
The detox process will allow you to break your physical and psychological dependence on the drugs you have been taking. Withdrawal symptoms will appear and you will want help. By seeking assistance from a licensed detox facility, this can be accomplished in a safe environment while being monitored by medical staff. When drug detox has been completed, it’s time to get treatment.
The Outpatient Treatment Option
In the real world, it’s not always possible for addiction sufferers to commit to a residential treatment program. When access to work, family and/or school is necessary, an intensive outpatient treatment program provides a viable alternative option.
At Steps to Recovery facility in Levittown, Pennsylvania, we focus a majority of our treatment efforts on treating the LGBTQ community. Our therapists are also trained to deal with dual diagnosis issues as well. This is done through an IOP or PHP program. Regardless of the option chosen, we strongly advocate for heavy family therapy in the treatment process.
More About Steps to Recovery
We provide a two-phase approach to treatment with an influence toward the 12-steps of recovery. In the first phase, patients instruction about their addiction. This allows them to learn about their triggers and further help them recognize the recurring issues that are driving their addiction.
In the second phase of treatment, we shift the focus to solutions. This usually includes the development of the life skills necessary to avoid triggers. You also learn to live life on life’s terms without the need to anesthetize yourself with drugs and/or alcohol.
You do not have to subject yourself to the misery of your addiction. When you’re ready for help, our professional staff members at Steps to Recovery will answer the call at 866.488.8684. With our help, there’s a realistic chance you can find the road to recovery, relapse free, never again have to face the adversity that comes with addiction.
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Why Does Everyone Tell Me I Need Drug Rehab?

While there are individuals who drink and use drugs who do not become addicted, millions of people will develop a substance abuse problem. When family and friends watch a loved one become addicted, they may not know how to help. If the addiction seems to be spiraling out of control, they may stage an intervention or try to nudge their loved one into going to drug rehab.
When Is Drug Rehab Necessary?
Drug rehab is generally necessary when someone has developed an addiction or drug dependency. While many people will try to hide their addiction, there are some signs that loved ones can look for. Patients may experience physical symptoms like changes in weight, dilated pupils, mood changes and financial problems. They may suddenly withdraw from friends and loved ones as their addiction spirals out of control.
Loved ones can look for signs of an addiction including:
Unexplained financial problems
Problems keeping a job or staying in school
Secretive behavior or lying
Sudden risk-taking behaviors
Legal problems
How Do I Know If I Have an Addiction?
In the early stages of an addiction, individuals may not have problems at work or financial issues. There are still some indicators that drugs are becoming a problem. The individual may find themselves using more than they intended to or using in larger doses. They may find themselves planning their day around when they can use next.
Even when the individual tries to stop using, they may find it difficult because of withdrawal effects. Before long, individuals may also find themselves lying to friends to cover up the extent of their addiction. They may find it hard to pay bills or meet social obligations as the drug becomes their top priority.
How to Get Help
The first step is realizing that there is a problem. After that step, an outpatient rehab or detox center can help patients begin their recovery. At an outpatient rehab like Steps to Recovery, patients can get help through dual diagnosis treatment, therapy, and long-term recovery planning.
Steps to Recovery is a Levittown, PA treatment center that offers extended pre-admissions involvement to help patients figure out the best treatment option. This intimate environment offers customized treatment and flexible programs. The rehab is designed to help every type of patient. Even if addiction treatment has failed in the past, the compassionate care at Steps to Recovery can help. Steps to Recovery offers:
Intensive outpatient treatment
Partial hospitalization programs
Outpatient care
Long-term recovery planning
Therapy options
Addiction education
If your family or friends keep telling you to get help, then you may need rehab. You do not have to go through this process alone. To overcome your addiction, call Steps to Recovery today at 866-488-8684.
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Which Drug Side Effects Are Life-Threatening?

There are many different drugs that can cause side effects while they are used and during the withdrawal process. Once someone has an addiction, quitting can cause side effects. Drug side effects can be potentially dangerous, so it is important to go through detox at a professional treatment center.
Are Drug Side Effects Dangerous?
Drug side effects can vary, but many common drugs can cause unwanted symptoms. Opiates can cause side effects in the short term and long term. When someone is using opiates like heroin or morphine, they may experience respiratory depression, nausea, drowsiness or paranoia.
Respiratory depression is an extremely dangerous symptom. It means that the body is not getting enough oxygen to support itself. Left untreated, this side effect can be deadly. Long-term effects of opiates include life-threatening symptoms like brain damage and liver damage.
Legal Drugs Are Life-Threatening As Well
Alcohol is the most commonly abused legal drug. While it may be legal, it can lead to severe side effects. Within the first day of quitting, patients can develop alcohol withdrawal symptoms like delirium tremens, seizures, and irregular heartbeat.
Unfortunately, all of these drug side effects can cause potentially dangerous complications. Delirium tremens cause symptoms like a rapid heartbeat, confusion and a fever. Up to 5 percent of patients who do not get professional treatment for delirium tremens may die from them. Irregular heartbeat and seizures can also be potentially deadly.
Getting Medical Support for Drug Side Effects
Because of the many dangerous symptoms associated with withdrawal, it is important to get professional treatment. At a treatment center, patients can get help managing withdrawal symptoms. They can also get recovery help with options such as:
Community integration
Sober living arrangements
Individual therapy
Cognitive behavioral therapy
Family sessions
Outpatient planning
Which Rehab Is Right for Me?
Every patient is different, so it is important to find a treatment center that offers exactly what you need to recovery. Patients who have had a hard time quitting before can get the compassionate support they need through a partial hospitalization program (PHP). At Steps to Recovery, the 30 to 45-day partial hospitalization program includes programs such as:
Treatment on six days a week
Five hours of therapy each day
Two individual therapy sessions every week
Community integration
Structured housing support
Support for co-occurring mental disorders
With the right customized, flexible program, patients can get the treatment they need to recover. An addiction specialist can help determine the right course of addiction treatment and therapy options. To find out how you or a loved one can start the recovery process, call Steps to Recovery today at 866-488-8684.
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What Is Psychotherapy and Why Would I Need It at Drug Rehab?

When it comes to treating an addiction, it takes more than just detox to stay sober. Before entering treatment, many patients wonder, “What is psychotherapy?” This treatment is one of the addiction counseling options that can help patients with their long-term recovery.
How Therapy Works With Addiction Treatment
The main goal of therapy is to help patients maintain their sobriety. Addictions can be triggered by certain situations, behaviors and social interactions. With therapy, patients can learn how to identify situations where relapsing is possible. In addition, therapy can help patients learn how to cope with negative emotions without using.
Therapy can help patients cope with life situations and past trauma. These types of situations can cause ongoing stress that makes getting clean a little harder. Through therapy, patients learn how to handle these situations, practice self-care and prevent a relapse.
What Is Psychotherapy?
Psychotherapy is a type of treatment that is used to treat mental health problems and addictions. Through psychotherapy, patients can learn how to understand their feelings and cope with difficult situations. While psychotherapy is used to treat different mental disorders, it is also extremely useful in treating addiction.
Other than finding out the answer to, “What is psychotherapy?”, patients can also discover the different types of therapy options available. Psychotherapy comes in different forms like cognitive behavioral therapy. Depending on the patient’s unique needs, they may utilize psychotherapy options such as:
Dialectical behavioral therapy to learn how to handle stress
Interpersonal psychotherapy to improve social relationships
Acceptance therapy to help patients commit to making changes
Psychoanalysis therapy to increase awareness about unconscious thoughts
Contingency management therapy for positive incentives to stay sober
Motivational interviewing to handle confrontation
What Type of Treatment Is the Best?
Learning the answer to, “What is psychotherapy?” is just the first step. Afterward, patients need to find the program and therapy options that work best for them. Rehab centers like Steps to Recovery offer patients help with severe co-occurring programs through compassionate, flexible programs. They use an extended pre-admissions program to make sure that each individual gets the best treatments for their unique addiction treatment.
During the first phase of treatment, patients use the partial hospitalization program to get intensive care. Afterward, patients begin an intensive outpatient program to focus even more on their recovery. Both phases offer help with family counseling, long-term sobriety, addiction education, 12-step program information and individual counseling.
Recovery is a process, and the right support can make a major difference. To find out how the collaborative programs at Steps to Recovery can help, call us at 866-488-8684.
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If You Don’t Know What Are Opioids You’re Not Watching the News

Before entering rehab, family and friends may ask the patient, “What are opioids?” For someone not familiar with drugs and addictions, this is a normal question to have. This type of drug includes legal and illegal chemicals that change how the mind works. Even when they are used according to a prescription, they can still be addictive.
What Are Opioids?
There are two basic answers to “What are opioids?” While both types of opioids cause changes to the brain, one class of opioids is sold on the street. Doctors prescribe the other type. Many patients may be familiar with powerful pain relievers like hydrocodone, morphine, oxycodone and codeine. Prescribed by a doctor, these types are legally given to treat pain.
Street drugs like heroin are also considered opioids. Like prescription pain relievers, they interact with the opioid receptors in the brain. Over time, they can change the wiring in the brain. Regular use of any opioids can lead to dependence. Even when the opioids are prescribed by a doctor, they can become addictive.
How an Addiction Starts
An opioid addiction often starts after the patient was given a prescription for opioids. They may have needed pain killers after a surgery or because of a chronic medical condition. Before long, these drugs can lead to an addiction.
Some individuals switch to drugs like heroin because painkillers are no longer available. The doctor may stop prescribing painkillers, or the prescription drugs become too expensive. The individual may seek out street drugs to fuel the addiction instead.
What Are Opioids – Types of Opioids and Treatment Options
Other than prescription painkillers, there are several types of opioids that are commonly sold on the streets. Heroin is one of the most common opioids, and it is often used after someone develops a prescription drug addiction. In recent years, fentanyl citrate has become a growing problem. While it is available through a prescription, fentanyl is often mixed with street drugs like heroin to create a better high.
Any type of opioid can cause an addiction. If someone suffers from an addiction, help is available. A drug treatment center can offer support through programs such as:
Group therapy and individual counseling
Relapse prevention techniques
Treating co-occurring disorders with dual diagnosis treatment
12-step program exploration
Addiction education
Medical supervision and support
Collaborative outpatient programs
If you or a loved one suffers from an addiction, help is available. At Steps to Recovery, you can get the customized, compassionate care you need to recover. To find out more about our flexible program options, call Steps to Recovery today at 866-488-8684.
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Look Out for Adderall Side Effects

Addiction can form in a variety of different ways, and Adderall side effects don’t only affect those with ADHD. In the United States, more people are passing away from prescription drug overdoses than any other type of drug. It’s important to understand how addiction to Adderall develops and why people abuse it. ADHD is a common reason why a person may develop an addiction, and it’s because the medication is a controlled substance with addictive qualities.
Adderall Side Effects and ADHD

Not everyone develops an addiction, but there are different risk factors that cause a person to develop this disease. The leading risk factor for developing an addiction is mental illness, and ADHD is very common. There are different arguments about this mental illness because some believe kids receive a diagnosis too young. The symptoms of ADHD can sometimes be completely normal for a person, but they might also be an issue.
The symptoms of ADHD include inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.
The reason there are debates about diagnosing children is because due to brain development, these symptoms might be normal. In any case, the medication given to anyone with this diagnosis helps him or her focus. The medication is a stimulant that also helps a person stay awake much longer while maintaining focus. Not only that, but the medication also releases dopamine, which can make the brain develop a dependence.
Developing Adderall Side Effects
Someone who has a prescription for this medication may begin abusing the medication by taking extra. This is very common among students as well as business professionals who want to get more work done. The person may justify his or her use because it is helping them be more productive, but it may be damaging their life. Using this medication can result in a person having issues at work, school or home.
There are also those who experience Adderall side effects because he or she just wants to get high. Many people buy the medication illegally in order to get the high that he or she is looking for. Many people also use the medication when drinking because it acts similarly to cocaine. The medication allows a person to drink more without experiencing all of the side effects of alcohol.
Adderall is a stimulant and has all the side effects that brings, such as sudden death, heart problems, stroke, heart attacks, mania/psychosis, hallucinations, agitation, aggression, skin reactions/problems, and restricted blood flow. These side effects should always be checked out by your doctor. If you find yourself addicted, we can help.
If you have an addiction to this medication or are beginning to see a problem with it, allow us to help. Steps to Recovery specializes in treating people with a prescription drug addiction, and we want to teach you a new way of living. Through various treatment methods as well as a 12-step program treatment model, we’ll help give you hope to live a better life. If you’re ready to be free from active addiction, call us today at 866-488-8684.
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Am I Going Through Drug Withdrawal?

Drug withdrawal occurs when someone is physically dependent on a substance and suddenly cuts off or reduces the supply of that substance to their body.
Because the body had previously become used to having that drug as a near-constant part of its system, the body will essentially be unable to function normally without the drug. Negative physical and mental side-effects will be the result. These are called withdrawal symptoms.
Sometimes, the cutting off or reduction of the drug intake is done intentionally. This is the case with a professional, medically monitored detox. Other times, the drug supply is simply not available to the user, or in many cases, someone struggling with drug abuse doesn’t think that they are actually physically dependent, so they simply stop using for whatever reason and then experience withdrawal.
Are You Going Through Drug Withdrawal?
If you’ve been using drugs or drinking heavily for a substantial chunk of time, it will be fairly obvious if you are going through withdrawal. Your consistent use of these substances will be your first sign. The more you use, the more dependent your body will become on them. There are some surefire signs that something is very wrong. Symptoms will vary depending on the drug.
Common Symptoms of Withdrawal
The worst symptoms associated with drug withdrawal happen after the cessation of alcohol or the cessation of opiates like painkillers or heroin.
Symptoms of alcohol withdrawal include profuse sweating, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, and vomiting. Irritability, anxiety, and disorientation may accompany the physical symptoms. Symptoms of opiate withdrawal include muscle spasms, chills, fever, deep bone aches and pains, insomnia, diarrhea and vomiting, depression and cramps.
There are other symptoms associated with other substances of abuse, but most of them are similar to these. Also keep in mind that factors like how long the person had been abusing drugs, how much they used on average, and what combination of drugs they used will influence withdrawal.
Getting Help for Drug Withdrawal
Naturally, symptoms of withdrawal can be extremely uncomfortable and painful. They can even be life-threatening. Furthermore, serious health issues like diabetes or high blood pressure can be triggered or exacerbated by withdrawal.
For this reason, professional help is absolutely necessary. At Steps to Recovery, we offer unique services to help you deal with withdrawal and find lasting help for addiction. These services include:
Individualized care
12-step program education
Intensive outpatient treatment plans and residential options
Connections to leading medically monitored detox programs
Sober living options
Contact Steps to Recovery Today
If you or your loved one are going through withdrawal because of a drug or alcohol addiction, it’s essential to get professional help. You can find the help you need by reaching out to our Levittown, PA addiction treatment center at 866-488-8684. Remember–it’s never too late to get sober.
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