The Dangers of Cocaine and Alcohol

Cocaine and alcohol, separately, are dangerously addictive drugs. Both are psychologically addicting, which means users can become mentally reliant on the drugs. However, the two can be even more dangerous when combined. Quickly, excessive use of cocaine and alcohol can derail someone’s life.
The Dangers of Cocaine and Alcohol
Peer pressure can often make people engage in poor decision-making. For example, at parties, cocaine and alcohol use can get out of control very fast. Even if you think you have your drug and alcohol habits under control, they can have devastating consequences.
A major problem exists in how the two drugs interact. Cocaine runs through the body quickly, leading many to ingest the drug in back-to-back sessions. Binge drinking often occurs in party environments as well.
Furthermore, polysubstance abuse exacerbates the side effects of both. Taken together, users might experience unwanted, unknown, and dangerous consequences. Ultimately, cocaine and alcohol can turn deadly due to the risk of overdosing or alcohol poisoning.
Signs of an overdose or alcohol poisoning include:
Vomiting
Irregular pulse
Blue coloring of the skin
Choking
Passing out
Seizures
Rise in blood pressure
Rise in body temperature
A significant risk of these two drugs is that they change the way your mind works. Cocaine impacts your dopamine receptors, changing how you perceive pleasure. Likewise, prolonged abuse of alcohol can have permanent psychological repercussions.
Signs that you or your loved one might have developed an addiction to cocaine or alcohol include:
Poor finances
Social isolation
Risky behaviors
Choosing to party or use drugs over other obligations
Irregular mood behaviors and sleeping patterns
Evidence of cocaine and alcohol residue
Cocaine and Alcohol Recovery
If you think that you have a problem with cocaine and alcohol, you may realize that you need help. Something that you’ll learn in a drug and alcohol rehab is why you need to be abstinent from both substances.
One of the reasons many people relapse is because they think only one of these substances is the issue. The reality is that due to how the brain works, it’s crucial that you live a sober, substance-free lifestyle.
The brain is designed to wire neurons together for all of the various habits that you set up. Abusing alcohol and cocaine together wires your mind to want both of these substances at the same time.
Many people relapse because they think they can drink and not do cocaine or vice versa. To recover fully, you’ll need to learn how to manage your life in a better way without either of these substances.
Steps to Recovery Can Help
Steps to Recovery offers Pennsylvania addiction recovery services here in Levittown, and we help the surrounding areas as well. Our staff is here to help you learn that it’s possible to live an incredible life without drugs or alcohol.
Through our program, you’ll regain hope and begin to mend the relationships with your loved ones as well as yourself. Some of the treatments we offer here include:
Addiction counseling
Group therapy
Family therapy
Intensive outpatient services
Partial hospitalization program
Get a handle on your cocaine and alcohol use before it derails your life. You deserve the best care available, so call us today at 866-488-8684.
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Struggling with Depression and Anxiety

When you’re struggling with a substance use disorder, you may wonder how you got to where you are. Without realizing it, you might begin resorting to alcohol and drugs as a coping mechanism. Many people who have an addiction to drugs or alcohol have an underlying mental illness as well, which needs treatment. Having depression and anxiety might be the reason you turn to substance use in the first place.
Self-Medication Due to Depression and Anxiety
Mental illness can develop for a wide range of reasons, and it typically starts in a person’s teenage years or early 20s. Two of the most common forms of mental illnesses are depression and anxiety. It’s entirely possible that someone begins to exhibit symptoms of depression and anxiety without knowing it. Consequently, turning to alcohol or drugs may be a misguided way of self-medicating.
Turning to drugs or alcohol may help alleviate symptoms initially, but they eventually make the symptoms worse. Being stuck in your active addiction alters the way that your brain creates different neurotransmitters.
Without the proper form of dual diagnosis treatment, it can be difficult to overcome your addiction. When you’re struggling with both mental illness and addiction, Steps to Recovery will guide you through the treatment you need.
Treating Depression and Anxiety
At a facility that specializes in dual diagnosis, you’re going to get treatment for your mental illness as well as your addiction. At Steps to Recovery, you’ll work individually with a licensed professional who can help give you a proper diagnosis of comorbidity.
It’s important to have a proper diagnosis because sometimes your depression or anxiety is part of another condition. Some other mental illnesses that can cause depression and anxiety can include the following:
PTSD
OCD
Bipolar Disorder
ADHD
Borderline Personality Disorder
The beautiful part about addiction treatment is that your mental illness can begin to get better as you stay clean. When you’re stuck in the cycle of addiction, you may have anxiety around where you’ll find your next high. You may also experience depression as a result of the way you’re living your life.
However, staying clean and sober can lead to an alleviation of your symptoms.
Getting the Help You Deserve at Steps to Recovery
Steps to Recovery is an addiction treatment center that also specializes in treating depression and anxiety. We offer Pennsylvania addiction recovery services, and we’re passionate about seeing people recovery.
With the help of our compassionate and caring staff, we will guide you through your recovery program. Soon, you’ll start to see the benefits of our treatment. Some of the therapeutic methods that we provide here at Steps to Recovery include the following:
Psychotherapy
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Group Therapy
Don’t let depression and anxiety control your life. At Steps to Recovery, we will lead you on your journey to achieve a more fulfilling life. Call us today at 866-488-8684.
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Anxiety Attack vs Panic Attack: Knowing the Difference

Addiction starts for a variety of different reasons, but one of the biggest reasons is when you have a mental illness. Dealing with symptoms of anxiety and panic can be extremely difficult and make it hard to live normally. For many people, turning to drugs or alcohol seems like the only way to manage their symptoms, but it isn’t. Understanding the differences of an anxiety attack vs panic attack can make treatment go more smoothly
Anxiety Attack vs Panic Attack
Many people don’t know the difference between an anxiety attack vs panic attack because they’re often used interchangeably. There are some differences when talking about the two, but they can both have similar symptoms.
When you’re struggling with these attacks on a regular basis, it can make it difficult to go to work, to school or to have a social life. The common symptoms of anxiety or panic attacks can include the following:
Elevated heart rate
Racing thoughts
Intense worrying
Shortness of breath
Adrenaline spike
The primary difference between these two is that an anxiety attack occurs when you react to a stressor. A stressor can come in a range of forms, such as a bill arriving in the mail or an uncomfortable social situation.
On the other hand, when experiencing a panic attack, there’s no stressor. A panic attack can appear to come out of nowhere.
Considering the reasons behind your anxiety attack vs panic attack, it can seem overwhelming. Both can be debilitating when they continue without the right treatment.
Moreover, when you’re dealing with these kinds of attacks and a substance use disorder at the same time, you likely have a dual diagnosis.
Dealing With Mental Illness and an Addiction
If you’re struggling with an addiction as well as panic or anxiety attacks, it’s important to get the proper help. At an addiction rehab facility that specializes in anxiety and panic disorder treatment, you’ll get the best care possible.
When you don’t treat the mental illness and the addiction separately, recovery is more difficult. For example, if you only overcome your addiction but not your anxiety, it could be more challenging to remain sober.
By seeking the help of Pennsylvania addiction recovery services, you’ll learn how to live a fulfilling new life. In treatment, you’ll work with licensed clinicians who specialize in mental illness and addiction recovery.
Additionally, you’ll learn coping skills that will help you decrease your stress and anxiety, which will give you hope. Through individual and group therapy, you’ll also learn how to live life without having to pick up a drink or a drug.
Seeking Help for Addiction at Steps to Recovery
Steps to Recovery in Levittown, PA is here to help you with your mental health and addiction. We have a dedicated staff, and our primary focus is on helping you rebuild relationships with loved ones as well as yourself. Through our addiction treatment program, you’ll see that there’s a better way of living. Some of the additional services we offer include:
Residential treatment
Outpatient treatment
Sober living
Figuring out the causes behind your stress can help direct you in learning about the differences between an anxiety attack vs panic attack. Steps to Recovery is here to lead you through the treatment process. Call us today at 866-488-8684 to get started on your journey to recovery.
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Understanding the Different Types of Eating Disorders

When dealing with an overwhelming addiction problem, it’s easy to disregard the impact of mental illness. However, drug and alcohol abuse often don’t occur alone. For example, types of eating disorders can have a devastating effect on someone’s life. They can also occur in conjunction with addiction. Understanding the interaction between eating disorders and substance abuse can help direct you towards the care you or your loved one may need.
Understanding the Types of Eating Disorders
There are a lot of misconceptions about eating disorders, and this is a reason why many people don’t get help. Sometimes it’s difficult for loved ones to know someone is struggling with one of the different types of eating disorders.
You might be someone with one of these disorders, but you might not be sure you need treatment or care. The most common forms of eating disorders include:
Anorexia Nervosa
Bulimia Nervosa
Binge Eating Disorder
Pica
Rumination Disorder
While some of these disorders have many similar symptoms, there are differences that you should know. For instance, anorexia nervosa can result in dramatic weight loss and a fixation on restrictive eating practices. Symptoms of binge eating, on the other hand, include hoarding and secretive practices around consuming food.
Not all forms of disordered eating look the same. Some people may not show any outward signs. Once someone begins to demonstrate drastic changes in how they relate to food, there should be reason for concern.
Disordered Eating and Mental Illness
Those who struggle with eating disorders often tend to experience symptoms of anxiety and depression as well. Although eating disorders involve physical symptoms, they are ultimately mental illnesses. Emotional and behavioral symptoms of eating disorders include:
Feelings of low self-esteem
Anxiety around eating in groups
Secretive behavior concerning food and exercise habits
Obsession over body size and shape
Mood swings
Change in social activities
Treating types of eating disorders is much more complicated than simply telling someone to “Just eat more,” or “Just eat less.” Therefore, finding the right professional treatment plan is an important step in recovery. Working with a professional will allow you to begin loving yourself again and learning new coping skills.
Overcoming an eating disorder is extremely difficult to do on your own, which is why you need support. Part of the treatment process and overcoming your depression is a lot easier when you have peers around you. In treatment, finding fellowship and support through others experiencing the same struggles will help you in recovery.
Steps to Recovery Can Help
Some types of eating disorders can be life-threatening and can become even more dangerous when paired with a substance use disorder. If you or your loved one is struggling with disordered eating and an addiction, allow Steps to Recovery to help. Our Pennsylvania addiction recovery services can help you or loved one regain control of life.
We’re an addiction and mental health treatment facility, and we want to be there to start you on your journey. Our goal is to assist you in living the life that you deserve to live without substances and with a healthy body. Some of the services we offer include:
Purging disorder treatment
Bulimia treatment
Inpatient treatment
Partial hospitalization program
Outpatient treatment
Aftercare
Services specifically for the LGBTQ+ community
Don’t let the different types of eating disorders or addiction control your life. With Steps to Recovery, you can entrust us in providing you with the treatment you or your loved one needs. For more information, call us today at 866-488-8684.
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What is Carfentanil?

With the growing opioid epidemic, more and more people are dying each year in the United States from overdoses. During these turbulent times, it’s important to have an education about what kind of opioids are out there. Someone you love may have an addiction to these drugs and may be at risk of losing their life to addiction. A question you may have about this fatal epidemic is, “What is carfentanil, and why is it such a dangerous drug to use?”
Basics of Carfentanil
When talking about the opioid crisis, you may know about prescription opioids, heroin, and fentanyl, but what is carfentanil? First, it’s important to understand that the disease of addiction is progressive and it gets worse over time. Most people didn’t start out with drugs like heroin. They start out with prescription opioids before progressing. Some people even receive these medications from a doctor, while others search them out illegally.
Some of the most common prescription opioids include:
Codeine
Hydrocodone
Hydromorphone
Meperidine
Methadone
Eventually, people build up a tolerance and dependence on prescription opioids, so they turn to something stronger. To continue getting high or avoid withdrawal, a person may turn to heroin, which is the most potent opioid.
One of the reasons heroin can be so dangerous is because of the presence of fentanyl, which is far more potent than heroin. However, carfentanil is even stronger. When it comes to carfentanil, it’s approximately 10,000 times stronger than morphine and 100 times stronger than fentanyl.
What is Carfentanil When it Comes to Addiction?
Although fentanyl is a major problem and cause of the overdoses in the United States, it’s also a prescription medication. Some doctors prescribe this medication for people who suffer from severe or chronic pain. This can lead to a dangerous dependency, and it affects a large part of the elderly community as well. If you or someone you know is struggling with fentanyl, it’s important to get help at fentanyl addiction treatment.
Getting Help Through Treatment at Steps to Recovery
If you’re struggling with an addiction to opioids, there is hope to recover and live a better life. Through addiction treatment, you’ll learn that you can manage your life one day at a time without picking up a drink or a drug. Through alcohol drug education, you’ll begin to understand the disease of addiction and why drugs affect you in a certain way. With our help, you’ll be able to stop wondering about what is carfentanil.
Here at Steps to Recovery, we offer individual as well as group therapy to help you overcome your addiction. Individual therapy will help you get down to the causes of your addiction and have a safe place to process your past. We encourage our clients to get involved in group therapy as well because peer support is something that can last you for years to come.
Some of the programs we offer include:
Residential treatment
Partial hospitalization program
Outpatient treatment
Sober living
Accepting environment for LGBTQ+ community
When you begin to get hooked on a certain drug, such as carfentanil, it can be easy to wonder “What is carfentanil?” You may have many questions and begin to feel that your life is spiraling out of control. At Steps to Recovery, we will help you get back on track. To learn more about our program, call us today at 866-488-8684.
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What is Methadone?

The current opioid epidemic in the United States is reaching unprecedented levels. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, around 115 people die every day in the United States from an opioid overdose. In efforts to combat the opioid epidemic, many states are prescribing methadone. You may be asking yourself, “What is methadone? What are the risks involved with taking it?”
For those concerned about the addictive qualities of methadone, these are important questions. Unfortunately, many people wind up seeking further addiction treatment to methadone once they begin taking it.
What is Methadone?
Methadone is a narcotic medication, and its original purpose was to help treat people with moderate to severe pain. It’s a synthetic analgesic medication that has similar effects to medications like morphine. When used correctly, methadone can assist in recovery from seriously addictive drugs, such as heroin and other narcotics.
The problem is that many people can develop an addiction as well as a dependency to this drug. Yet, there are still many people who believe methadone is the answer to the opioid epidemic. So, what is methadone maintenance?
The goal of methadone maintenance is to provide people with a controlled alternative to get off drugs like heroin. The primary issue is that your dependency can make it hard to get off because you develop the following symptoms:
Aches and pains
Nausea
Anxiety
Flu-like symptoms
Depression
What is Methadone Detox and Treatment?
While methadone may have helped you get off of a drug like heroin or prescription opioids, it can cause your life to become chaotic. If this sounds like something you’re struggling with, a methadone addiction treatment can help you recover.
The first step in this process is doing a safe medical detox to help you through the symptoms of withdrawal. You’ll have medical staff with you at all times to make you as safe and comfortable as possible.
One of the issues with methadone maintenance is that you’re just switching from one drug to another. Through various forms of therapy, you’ll start to see that recovery is possible, and you can live a better life. This is done with the help of licensed therapists as well as the support you receive from your peers in treatment.
Getting the Help You Need at Steps to Recovery
Steps to Recovery is located in Levittown, PA, and we’re a drug and alcohol treatment facility that wants to help. No matter what your situation is or how low your addiction has taken you, we can help you live a new life. Our passionate and dedicated staff has one goal, and that is to provide you with the hope that life can get better. We help treat our clients through some of the following methods and more:
Alcohol drug education
Family therapy
Psychotherapy
Cognitive behavioral therapy
Intensive outpatient program
Partial hospitalization program
Services catered for the LGBTQ+ community
Getting hooked and addicted to methadone can be easy when you’re still wondering “What is methadone?” However, with Steps to Recovery, you can enter the treatment you need to get clean. If you’re ready to start this new journey, call us today at 866-488-8684.
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Binge Drinking: Why is it Dangerous?

One of the most prominent addiction issues that the world faces today comes in the form of alcoholism. Many people think of alcohol as a harmless substance because it’s so widely used. In reality, tens of thousands of people die from alcoholism each year. Binge drinking is one of the first signs of addiction, and it can be very harmful.
The Dangers of Binge Drinking
Understanding the habits of binge drinking can help you figure out whether or not you should seek help. You might be someone who believes you don’t need alcohol abuse treatment, but binging on alcohol can be a warning sign.
Biological sex, body size, medication, an empty stomach, speed of drinking, and other health concerns can impact alcohol tolerance. In other words, the impact of alcohol consumption is relative to each person. Therefore, it can be hard to pinpoint at what point regular drinking habits turn into alcohol abuse.
Short-term, excessive alcohol consumption can result in fatal alcohol poisoning. Long-term, binge drinking can damage your internal organs. Excessive alcohol use has drastic effects on your heart, liver, and kidneys.
Are you Binge Drinking Too Much?
Addiction is a baffling disease because many people remain high-functioning. Many who struggle with alcoholism find themselves in a state of denial. Social environments and casual drinking can help disguise alcohol abuse. However, the signs that you need to look for to know if you have a drinking problem can include the following:
You’re binging on alcohol more often than not
Your drinking is affecting your work or school
Loved ones have made comments about the amount you drink
You experience symptoms of withdrawal when you’re not drinking
You have a hard time limiting the number of drinks once you start drinking
Many people don’t realize these are signs of addiction because they don’t receive proper alcohol drug education. The good news is that the sooner you can catch these signs means that you have a better chance of recovery.
Recovery can be challenging, which is why you need the help of an addiction treatment center. In treatment, our compassionate care will help guide you to an alcohol-free, fulfilling life.
Getting Help from Steps to Recovery
Steps to Recovery is an addiction treatment center that’s here to help you regain control. Our process starts with a safe, medical detox so you won’t have to worry about the harsh symptoms of withdrawal. From there, we have a team of licensed professionals who will help you overcome your addiction for good.
Our goal is to teach you that there’s a life that awaits you beyond binge drinking. With our transparent and collaborative treatment, you can repair your life and relationships. Some of the services we offer include:
Men’s rehab
Women’s rehab
An accepting environment for LGBTQ+ clients
Get started on the path to recovery today. Don’t let binge drinking control your life. To learn more about how we can help you recover from alcohol addiction, call us today at 866-488-8684.
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Is Addiction Genetic?

Are your genes to blame for your substance abuse problem? There’s some evidence that suggests it could lead to heightened susceptibility to drug or alcohol abuse. At the same time, there’s no addiction gene. Is addiction genetic, or is there something else happening?
Is Addiction Genetic – in the Strictest Sense of the Word?
There’s no proof of heredity. In other words, there isn’t a gene that turns on your susceptibility to drug abuse. However, there’s proof that genetics may predisposition you to be more likely to fall victim to the disease. If your mother struggled with alcohol abuse, you’re more likely to do so as well.
Unlike hereditary conditions, however, your predisposition doesn’t translate into inevitability. Remember that genetic disorders will always express themselves. Inclinations do not. What other factors may put you in jeopardy of experiencing addiction?
Understanding Other Contributing Factors
Looking past your genetic predisposition, other factors may also affect your decision to use drugs. Social and cultural pressures have a lot of influence. If your circle of friends participates in drug abuse, there’s a good chance that you might as well. A permissive attitude toward drug abuse or alcohol excess in the home is another influencer.
Overcoming Addiction with Rehab
Good-quality Pennsylvania addiction recovery services provide a broad range of treatment options. Customization of the experience begins with an intake interview. A therapist learns about you and your treatment requirements. This process ensures that you receive treatment that meets your needs.
As a result, no two rehab experiences are identical. Possible modalities include:
Family counseling that positions your loved ones as a support network for future relapse prevention
Goal-setting in talk therapy sessions as a means of planning for independent living after treatment
Treatment delivery options that include partial hospitalization or intensive outpatient rehab
Cognitive behavioral therapy, which encourages changes to dysfunctional patterns in thinking and acting
Psychotherapy that provides care for trauma and co-occurring mental health disorders
Recognizing the Need for Dual Diagnosis Treatments
In addition to genetic, social, and cultural influences, there are also mental health factors. Depression and anxiety are two psychiatric conditions that may affect your decision to use a drug or alcohol. You self-medicate with stimulants or nervous system depressants. In fact, many people don’t recognize that they present with a dual diagnosis.
You may have been struggling your entire life with social anxiety, for example. Nobody recognized it as a disorder. To deal with the problem, you lean on a drug. It doesn’t make the problem go away, but it seems easier to deal with.
Getting Help for Drug Abuse Today with Steps to Recovery
So, is addiction genetic? There’s a genetic component to the disease for sure. But there’s so much more at play. Contact the addiction treatment providers at Steps to Recovery by calling 866-488-8684 to learn more and get help.
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Eating Disorder Statistics [Infographic]

Ask almost anyone how they feel about their bodies and you will get a response that includes something they want to change. Most often, this change has to deal with body weight. With the pressure to look perfect and fit the ideal mold at an all-time high, many of us place a focus on our weight. However, when that focus interferes with everyday life, you could be suffering from an eating disorder. A look at the current eating disorder statistics will show that this problem is a very dangerous epidemic across the United States.
The common misconception about eating disorders is that only teenagers struggle. However, eating disorder statistics show that anyone can struggle with the disorders. In fact, 30 million Americans struggle with some type of eating disorder.
Types of Eating Disorders
It’s essential to understand that there are numerous types of eating disorders. Being able to identify these issues can better equip you to find help for either yourself or your loved one. With one death every 62 minutes being a direct result of an eating disorder, finding help is crucial. Here are the most common types of eating disorders.
Anorexia Nervosa
When someone hears the term eating disorder, they most often think of Anorexia. Those who suffer from this disorder have a low body weight from restricting their diet, with some not eating at all. Some individuals will also have a fear of gaining weight while failing to realize how low their weight actually is. Statistics show that about half of those who struggle with Anorexia also have a comorbid mood or anxiety disorder as well.
Binge Eating Disorder
This disorder is the recurring periods of eating larger amounts of food within a two hour time period. It also includes the lack of control when eating during these periods. The episode ends with the individual experiencing emotions of guilt, embarrassment, and disgust. They usually eat until feeling uncomfortable, eat more quickly than normal, or eating large amounts without being actually hungry. Binge eating disorder treatment will help patients learn how to have a healthier relationship with food. Because half of the risk for suffering from the disorder is genetic, treatment will provide you with coping mechanisms to manage your negative thoughts about food and your weight.
Bulimia Nervosa
An individual struggling with Bulimia Nervosa experiences episodes similar to a Binge Eating Disorder. However, these episodes are followed by attempts to compensate for the intake of food. This includes:
Excessive exercise
Fasting
Laxatives
Self-induced vomiting
Diuretics
The individual also struggles with a severe worry about their weight and their figure. Bulimia treatment can provide patients with the tools they need to have a healthy approach to maintaining a suitable weight. One in ten Bulimia patients has a comorbid substance abuse disorder, like alcohol abuse. This means that patients will need dual diagnosis treatment to manage both problems at the same time.
Diabulimia
Individuals who suffer from Diabulimia are those that also have type one diabetes. Those who struggle with Diabulimia intentionally and deliberately withhold insulin to control their weight. An estimated 16% of males and 38% of females who have type one diabetes also struggle with this type of eating disorder.
Don’t Become Part of the Eating Disorder Statistics
If you or a loved one is in need of eating disorder treatment, seek out help at Steps to Recovery. We offer various therapies and treatment methods to help you from becoming a number within the eating disorder statistics. To learn more about your options, call us today at 866-488-8684.
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Opioids vs Opiates: Understanding the Difference

When discussing opioids vs opiates, most people use the terms interchangeably. Although there are plenty of similarities, what stands out is the almost identical addiction potential. It’s interesting to note that treatment for addiction also follows similar protocols. Here’s what you need to know.
Opioids vs Opiates
Both types of substances relieve pain. They’re nervous system depressants. Opiates trace their origins back to the opium poppy. Examples include morphine, codeine, and heroin.
Morphine and codeine are medications. Heroin is an illicit street drug. On the other side of the equation are opioids. These full or partial synthetics function as prescription pain pills.
Examples include fentanyl, hydrocodone, and oxycodone. Both types of substances drastically change the way that your body communicates with the brain. And, in the right dosing, they can create a euphoric high.
How Addiction Happens
You don’t plan to develop an addiction. In fact, it probably happened slowly. First, your body developed a tolerance. You increased the dose. Next, the drug changed the way that your brain releases dopamine.
Being high is now the new normal just for functioning throughout the day. If you try to stop using, you suffer debilitating withdrawal symptoms. The high is now a secondary motivation. You like the euphoria, but you’re just as scared of the withdrawal.
Stopping the Habit
Opioid dependence treatment can take place during a partial hospitalization. Therapists customize a treatment protocol that considers your individual needs. Modalities might include:
One-on-one talk therapy sessions for goal-setting and behavioral therapy
Dual diagnosis assessment and treatment of co-occurring mental health conditions
Family counseling that emphasizes support of and by your loved ones
Group therapy that focuses on peer support and alcohol drug education
Access to 12 Step groups that introduce accountability for relapse prevention
Why is Family Therapy Important?
Opiate or opioid addiction isolates you. At this time, you may not recognize the rift that opened up between you and loved ones. Addiction recovery isn’t something that happens in a vacuum. Therefore, you need the support of friends or family members to heal.
Family therapy enables your loved ones to heal, too. During sessions, you address communication breakdowns and find healthy ways to interact. Moreover, you have the opportunity to reevaluate family dynamics and roles. This is also an opportunity to take responsibility for the damage that the addiction did.
In situations where there’s co-dependency, there’s an additional need for therapeutic intervention. Trained counselors will help you to find a way out of the trap that codependency creates. It also emphasizes the need to do so for your partner or spouse. Doing so makes real recovery possible.
Don’t Wait to Get Help from Steps to Recovery
One thing that’s lost in the opioids vs opiates debate is the fact that addiction doesn’t get better by itself. You don’t wake up one morning without cravings or withdrawal symptoms. Finding a way out of substance abuse calls for professional intervention. The therapists at Steps to Recovery want to be by your side every step of the way; call 866-488-8684 today.
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