The Difference Between Disordered Eating vs Eating Disorder

Diagnosing an eating disorder such as bulimia or anorexia is fairly easy for most professionals. These disorders have very distinct characteristics that are easy for just about anyone to pick out. However, pinpointing disordered eating isn’t so easy. Let’s take a closer look at the difference between disordered eating vs eating disorder.
Disordered Eating vs Eating Disorder
According to reports, nearly 50 percent of the U.S. population has some form of disordered eating. With that said, only about 3 percent has a clinical eating disorder. This means that people with an eating disorder show signs of disordered eating. However, not everyone that show signs of disordered eating has a full-blown eating disorder.
Disordered eating refers to people who engage in or show abnormal eating patterns on a regular basis. Keep in mind that this term doesn’t apply to those who have food allergies or intolerances. It also doesn’t refer to people who can’t eat certain foods because of health problems.
People who struggle with disordered eating often show many of the same symptoms as those who have an eating disorder. However, they usually display these symptoms to a lesser degree.
Despite this fact, they have to take disordered eating seriously because it can quickly develop into an eating disorder. For that reason, finding eating disorder treatment is extremely important in either case.
How Does Disordered Eating Start?
Knowing the difference between disordered eating vs eating disorder is important. However, it’s just as important to know how disordered eating starts. It can begin in several ways.
One of the most common is an intense focus on weight loss. People who want to lose weight watch their calorie intake heavily. With that said, this intense focus is actually a distraction to take their attention off of uncomfortable emotions. People start to feel like reaching their goal weight will make them happy.
Until they deal with the actual problem, though, their weight loss distraction won’t help. Once they reach their goal weight, they make a lower goal. Then, they eventually develop an eating disorder.
Drug addiction can also lead to the development of disordered eating. Various drugs have different effects on how people eat. Some drugs make them eat more, while others reduce how much that they eat. These effects quickly lead to disordered eating and eventually eating disorder.
When dealing with addiction, people no longer need to focus only on disordered eating vs eating disorder. Instead, they have to focus on getting the addiction under control as well. Until they do that, they can never truly break free from disordered eating.
Let Us Help You Overcome Addiction Safely
Is a drug addiction causing you to eat unhealthily? At Steps to Recovery, we offer Pennsylvania addiction recovery services. We understand how drug addiction and eating disorders can occur together. Some of the drug addiction programs that we offer include:
12-step rehab
Dual diagnosis treatment
Intensive outpatient rehab
Partial hospitalization program
Gender-specific rehab
Basic life skills
Don’t let your disordered eating problem develop into a full-blown disorder. Find out more about disordered eating vs eating disorder and how it affects addiction. Call us today at 866-488-8684 to get help.
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Is Marijuana Bad for You?

With the legalization of marijuana in certain states, there’s a huge debate going on. This debate focuses on the potential health risks of smoking marijuana. Because of that, people are asking, “Is marijuana bad for you?” While it’s true that marijuana isn’t the most dangerous drug, it may have some health risks.
Causal vs Heavy Use
First, it’s important to start with the facts. Experts haven’t found much evidence to suggest that occasional marijuana use leads to long-term health problems. With that said, they have found that heavy and long-term pot use might have lingering effects on the body. In either case, experts say that it’s far too early to tell if heavy pot use has long-term consequences.
Synthetic vs Natural Marijuana
Is marijuana bad for you? Some of the horror stories that people hear about pot don’t actually involve natural weed. Instead, these stories involve a substance that people refer to as synthetic marijuana. This drug, which some people call Spice because of branding, is hazardous. Unlike natural marijuana, it’s toxic.
Fake weed can cause many terrible health problems that range from vomiting to seizures. The main reason is that the makers spray the plant pieces with harmful chemicals. To make matters worse, this drug is hard for the government to regulate. In fact, many people get away with selling it in convenience stores.
The sellers escape the consequences because they label fake weed with “not for human consumption.” With this label, people can buy the drug cheap and without going through an illegal dealer. Also, the chemicals to make this drug always change, so the government has a hard time banning it.
Is Marijuana Bad for You?
It’s not easy to answer the question, “Is marijuana bad for you?” However, even casual weed smokers might experience some health problems. For example, those who smoke weed often have trouble thinking, bloodshot eyes and slowed coordination. The real danger that weed presents, though, is what people do while they’re high.
In Australia, just over 4 percent of all driver fatalities tested positive for cannabis intoxication. On top of that, workers who tested positive for weed had 55 percent more accidents in the workplace than those who didn’t. Their absence from work was also 75 percent higher.
In regard to health, the verdict is still out on just how bad weed is for people. However, people who smoke weed tend to make bad choices.
Don’t Let Marijuana Use Lead You Down the Wrong Path
Just because weed isn’t as addictive as other drugs doesn’t mean that it’s not as dangerous. At Steps to Recovery, we want to help people answer the question, “Is marijuana bad for you?” We believe that it is and we aim to help you overcome it’s hold on you. Some of the programs that we offer include:
Intensive outpatient program
Alcohol drug education
Outpatient treatment
Basic life skills training
12-step rehab
Gender-specific rehab
Don’t hesitate to ask, “Is marijuana bad for you?” Break free from your marijuana habit too. Reach out to us today at 866-488-8684 for more information.
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Enjoying a Sober Halloween

The Holidays present a challenging time for those who have gone through addiction treatment. A little-advanced preparation will go a long way toward helping you succeed in your efforts to stay sober. The following information outlines some important tips for having a sober Halloween this Holiday season.
The Link between Holidays and Substance Abuse
Relapse prevention is possible with some basic understanding of the challenges that the Holidays can present. Generally, most people celebrate the Holidays by attending gatherings that center around food and alcoholic beverages. The general relaxed spirit at these festivities may encourage some people to let their guard down when it comes to various temptations. Careful planning will help you have a sober Halloween while still enjoying all the fun that this holiday has to offer.
Tips for Enjoying a Sober Halloween
The following tips and advice can help you plan for a sober Halloween. Don’t forget to enlist the help and support of your family members and friends along the way. After all, they want to see you succeed in remaining sober.
Change Your Scenery
If you were in the habit of attending specific parties while you were using drugs or alcohol, it may be best to avoid these places entirely. Being in these locations can trigger memories that may encourage strong cravings. By the same token, be sure to avoid past acquaintances who still abuse addictive substances.
Have a Response Ready
Always have a response ready for those who might offer you an addictive substance. If the people are not aware of your history, you don’t necessarily need to share this information. Simply have a short reply in mind to make these situations easier.
Create New Holiday-Related Traditions
You can also use your newfound sobriety as an opportunity to create new Holiday traditions. Perhaps you will decide to completely forgo any parties or activities to enjoy your sober Halloween. Rather, you may host a party in your own home or engage in other exciting activities with family and friends.
Eat and Drink Before Attending Parties
If you do choose to attend parties where addictive substances may be present, it will help if you eat and drink before you arrive. Arriving hungry or thirsty may allow your resolve to remain sober to wane. Arrive at any holiday-related events hydrated and well-rested so that you will be more equipped to resist temptation.
Have a Support Person
Many people who have completed addiction treatment have at least one person they can call at any time they are feeling weak. You may even choose to have several close friends or companions that you can rely on. Keep these phone numbers with you at all times. Reach out to your support network anytime you feel vulnerable.
Help Your Loved One Have a Sober Halloween
Family support can be very beneficial for those looking for ways to have a sober Halloween. It may be helpful to sit down and talk about your Holiday plans as a family. Be sure to let your loved ones know the weaknesses that concern you the most. They can be a lifeline of support when temptations arise.
Finding appropriate Pennsylvania addiction recovery services doesn’t have to be challenging. Steps to Recovery is a rehabilitation center in Levittown, PA. The dedicated staff at Steps to Recovery provide access to many forms of holistic treatment for substance abuse issues. The serene setting also promotes deeper insight that allows maximum healing to occur.
Don’t let an unaddressed addiction control your happiness. The right treatment center can teach you how to overcome addiction issues. Contact Steps to Recovery at 866-488-8684 to discover how to enjoy your first sober Halloween.
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What Is THC?

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is a chemical found in marijuana. In fact, this chemical is responsible for most of the psychological effects that weed causes. However, what is THC, and what kind of impact does it have on the body?
What Is THC?
THC is a cannabinoid that occurs naturally in cannabis plants. In people, it causes psychological effects. In plants, it and other cannabinoids are secondary metabolites. They have no primary role in the development of the plants.
If THC doesn’t help the plant develop, why does the plant produce it? Researchers believe that secondary metabolites act as an immune system for the plant. They defend it from parasites, pests, and other predators.
Unfortunately for cannabis plants, cannabinoids don’t keep people away like they do other creatures. In fact, people seek out these plants for their THC.
THC Effects on the Body
Why does THC cause psychological effects in the body? The reason is that it binds to cannabinoid receptors in the brain. In fact, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) says that THC acts similar to the cannabinoid chemicals. The brain naturally produces those chemicals.
Cannabinoid receptors are in the area of the brain that regulates pleasure, memory, thinking, and perception. When THC attaches to them, it activates them, which affects people’s perceptions and senses.
THC also stimulates the cells in the brain that release dopamine. The increase in dopamine creates a euphoric effect. It also interacts with the hippocampus, which is the area of the brain that makes new memories.
What Risks Does THC Pose?
Aside from the basics of what is THC, it’s important to learn that there are risks of using it. According to the NIDA, it can cause many health problems.
For example, THC can trigger schizophrenia symptoms. It also impairs motor skills and interferes with making decisions. THC can lead people to make poor choices that put themselves and those around them in trouble too.
THC Detox
Like most drugs, people can develop an addiction to marijuana. It develops as a result of the increase in dopamine that THC causes in the body. Any activity that increases dopamine levels can cause addiction. For this reason, people can develop the disease to shopping, having sex, gambling, and other pleasures.
When people develop an addiction to marijuana, they have to go through THC detox. Like drug alcohol detox, it’s best to seek professional help for THX detox. With that said, the effects of THC withdrawal are less intense than those of alcohol withdrawal.
Let Us Help You Overcome Marijuana Addiction
Now you know more about what is THC and the problems that it can cause. Steps to Recovery offers Pennsylvania addiction recovery services that help you overcome marijuana addiction. Of course, we provide more than that, and some of our other programs include:
Individual and group therapies
Intensive outpatient rehab
Dual diagnosis treatment
Long-term sobriety goals
Life skills training
Family therapy
Don’t wait to start THC addiction recovery. Learn more about what is THC. Reach out to our friendly staff today at 866-488-8684.
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Is there a Connection Between Alcohol and Depression?

Alcohol is on the menu for most any celebration. If you want to be happy and cheerful, you drink. However, there’s a dark side to the drug. For instance, did you know that there’s a connection between alcohol and depression?
The Alcohol High and Low
Have a drink or two, and you’ll notice your inhibitions slipping. You’re more at ease in social situations. You feel like you’re relaxing. In contrast, depression symptoms occur when you overdo alcohol consumption.
You might feel sad and mourn past relationships. You feel guilt over missed opportunities. For some, the guilt turns into anger and violent outbursts. Frequently, the depression continues even after alcohol consumption ends.
How Alcohol and Depression Connect
It’s possible for depression to become a substance-induced mood disorder. The drug affects specific neurotransmitters in the brain. Therefore, it creates a chemical imbalance. For some people, it results in a worsening of depression.
Others reach for alcohol as a way to deal with an underlying depressive disorder. In this case, alcohol and depression connect through self-medicating behaviors. You drink to distract yourself from intrusive thoughts and feelings. Over time, you develop a dependency on the drug.
This situation eventually begins to feed on itself. Depression and alcohol abuse lead to problematic situations. Furthermore, you find yourself in trouble with friends or family members. Alcohol and depression now connect because the drug causes the disorder, which you try to handle by using the drug.
Deal with Both Conditions Concurrently for Best Results
Work with a rehab facility that specializes in dual diagnosis treatment. Therapists help you manage your depression while assisting you in overcoming addiction. Modalities include:
One-on-one talk therapy for goal-setting
Group counseling as a way to integrate peer support in recovery
Psychotherapy that helps with the co-occurring disorder
Family therapy to encourage open communication and an end to co-dependency patterns
Life skills training, which provides you with alternatives for dealing with stressors and triggers
In many cases, you can receive this level of care at the partial hospitalization level. You continue to live at home but visit the rehab center every day for treatment. There’s no need to quit your job or let go of family responsibilities. As you progress in your therapy, you’ll eventually graduate to an intensive outpatient program.
That said, some program participants might start at the outpatient level. It depends on your treatment needs and the severity of the alcohol use disorder. Talking with an intake counselor at a facility helps you to make this decision.
How to Get Help for Alcohol and Depression Abuse at the Same Time
The Pennsylvania addiction recovery services that Steps to Recovery provide is an excellent starting point for healing. Find out how alcohol and depression are affecting every facet of your life and how to overcome both. You don’t have to continue in this vicious cycle of alcohol abuse and mood disorders. Call 866-488-8684 right now for immediate assistance.
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Understanding the Difference Between Detox vs Rehab

Overcoming drug and alcohol addiction isn’t easy, but it’s worth it. Instead of feeling stuck in a damaging cycle of using, you can break free and create a better future. If you don’t know the difference between detox vs rehab, you might not understand why both steps are so important. See how each benefits you as you work toward lasting sobriety.
What’s the Difference Between Detox vs Rehab?
Many people try and quit using on their own, but they quickly relapse. If they only go through the detox process, it’s easy to see why.
Detox and rehab aren’t the same things, although both of them are important for beating addiction. What are the differences between detox vs rehab?
Detox is the process of getting all addictive substances out of your body. This could mean going “cold turkey,” where you stop using completely. Depending on the severity of your addiction, however, cold turkey may be too dangerous.
When you detox, your body goes through withdrawal, which includes a range of symptoms, ranging from mild to intense. You may feel nauseous, anxious, tired, confused and depressed. However, detox doesn’t last long, and the worst of your symptoms occur in the first few days after you stop using.
Rehab happens after drug alcohol detox. You may attend inpatient or outpatient treatment. Rehab lasts longer than detox, with many programs running 30 to 60 days, sometimes longer.
During rehab, you participate in various forms of therapies. You also learn to manage stress and negative emotions in positive, productive ways.
Why You Need Both Detox and Rehab
There are differences between detox vs rehab, but both are essential for lasting recovery.
You must get clean before you’re in the right frame of mind to go through rehab, which is why detox is so important. However, you can’t stop at detox because this process doesn’t address the deeper issues behind your addiction. That’s what rehab does.
In rehab, you’ll attend individual and group therapy sessions. You might also participate in family therapy and behavioral therapies. All of these therapies work together to heal you on every level. You’ll learn valuable coping skills that you can use for life.
There are differences in detox vs rehab. When you go through both, you have a better chance at maintaining your sobriety.
Authentic and Collaborative Addiction Treatment
Steps to Recovery is an addiction treatment center that provides Pennsylvania addiction recovery services. Located in Levittown, we can refer you to a PA detox center. At our facility, clients can start an effective rehab program that may include:
Addiction counseling
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)
Outpatient treatment program
Intensive outpatient program (IOP)
Dual diagnosis treatment
Addiction treatment can make the difference between not having a future and creating a better one than you thought possible. Let the caring staff at Steps to Recovery show you how to win the battle against drug and alcohol dependency by calling us today at 866-488-8684.
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How Addictive is Xanax?

There’s a massive addiction crisis in the United States, and one of the primary reasons is addictive prescription medications. While opioids are a leading cause of overdose and can lead to the use of heroin, other medications are dangerous as well. Xanax is a medication people use to manage symptoms of anxiety, but it can lead to fatal consequences. If you have a loved one who is taking this medication, it’s important that you know the answer to, “How addictive is Xanax?”
How Addictive is Xanax for Anxiety Patients?
Addiction is an extremely cunning disease, and it makes people believe that they don’t have a problem. This is a situation that becomes even worse when the addiction is to medications that are given by a doctor. It’s easy to justify and rationalize use when a doctor s providing the medication for symptoms of anxiety. The problem is, many people don’t ask, “How addictive is Xanax?”, and many doctors don’t disclose this information very often either.
Some of the symptoms doctors prescribe Xanax for include the following:
Racing thoughts
Constant worry
Irrational fears
Increased heart rate
Anxiety in social situations
The problem with Xanax is that not only does it alleviate symptoms of anxiety, but it also releases pleasure chemicals in the brain. While someone may have started taking the medication to decrease anxiety, that can change over time. Due to the way Xanax affects the brain, the person may begin using the medication to get a feeling rather than alleviate anxiety. This is typically how a Xanax addiction develops, and one of the primary signs is when a person becomes physically dependent.
How Addictive is Xanax for Young People?
More and more studies show that young people are experimenting with prescription medications more than ever before. Xanax is one of the primary substances that young people turn to because it’s so easily accessible. Even with alcohol drug education provided by schools, many young people still experiment with the drug to get high. Young people are far more susceptible to the disease of addiction due to the way the brain develops. Young people don’t have a fully developed prefrontal cortex, which is responsible for helping make logical decisions when it comes to assessing potential risks.
Getting Help for an Addiction to Xanax
Steps to Recovery is a drug and alcohol treatment center in Levittown, PA. We want you to know the answer to, “How addictive is Xanax?” so you can get the help for someone you love. Addiction is a progressive illness, so it’s much easier to treat when the person gets help as soon as possible. We understand that some people who have an addiction to this medication struggle with anxiety, but we can help. We offer dual diagnosis treatment as well as the following programs:
Family therapy
Group therapy
Cognitive behavioral therapy
How addictive is Xanax? Don’t wait to find out. For the help you need, call Steps to Recovery today at 866-488-8684.
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What Are Cognitive Disorders?

It’s not very often that people suffer from only one mental disorder. Experts suggest that once the brain develops any disorder, it’s easy for it to form another. Since addiction is a psychological disorder, it’s easy for people to develop other conditions alongside it. One such example is cognitive disorders.
What Are Cognitive Disorders?
Cognitive disorders (CDs) refer to an entire category of mental health conditions. In general, they’re subtle to start with but eventually impede on people’s quality of life. To get a better understanding of these disorders, people need to know which disorders fit into this category.
Types of CDs
All of the disorders that fit into this category are neurocognitive disorders. Some of them come from substance abuse, including substance-induced cognitive impairment. Other disorders that fit into this category include:
Developmental disorders
Dementia
Amnesia
Motor skills disorders
Alzheimer’s disease
Unfortunately, doctors don’t know what causes cognitive disorders in most people. However, some of them say that CDs occur because of a hormonal imbalance. Others say that they’re the result of genetics that parents pass down to their children. With that said, poor nutrition and a lack of cognitive stimulation during childhood can also lead to cognitive conditions.
Treating CDs
Treating CDs depends heavily on the types of disorders that people have. For example, Alzheimer’s disease isn’t curable. However, doctors can use specific techniques to slow down the progression of this disorder. In other cases, doctors can use therapies to help people overcome cognitive disorders.
For example, cognitive behavioral therapy often helps people with mild forms of CDs. Sometimes, the treatment has to address a trauma that led to the development of the CD in the first place.
Signs of CDs
To get help for someone who suffers from CDs, people need to know what to look for. Some common signs include confusion, memory loss, and poor motor coordination. Others suffer from more objective problems such as impaired judgment. It’s often hard to spot signs of impaired judgment since this symptom is subjective.
Learn More About Overcoming Addiction and Underlying Disorders
At Steps to Recovery, we go out of our way to provide reliable addiction therapy services. Using programs such as dual diagnosis treatment, we can help you overcome addiction and cognitive disorders. Providing individual treatment plans sets us apart from other rehab centers in the area. Some of the services that we use include:
Family counseling
Group and individual therapies
Trauma therapy
Intensive outpatient rehab
Coping skills education
Holistic therapy
Don’t try to treat your addiction without addressing underlying disorders. Learn more about the link between cognitive disorders and addiction. Reach out to us at 866-488-8684 to learn more about our Pennsylvania addiction recovery services.
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Common Social Anxiety Disorder Symptoms

Numerous mental disorders go hand in hand with substance use disorder. One example is a social anxiety disorder. It’s important for people to learn more about this disorder and some social anxiety disorder symptoms. The more that they know, the more ready they’ll be to seek out help or find help for their loved one.
What Is Social Anxiety Disorder?
Also called social phobia, this condition is one of the most common anxiety disorders that people develop. As the name suggests, it makes them afraid of social situations. These might include answering questions in front of peers, meeting new people, going on a date or attending social events.
When people with social anxiety disorder engage in activities in front of others, they feel fear and anxiety. They worry that others might reject, judge or even humiliate them. This fear or anxiety feeds social anxiety disorder symptoms.
What Are Some Social Anxiety Disorder Symptoms?
People might experience several social anxiety disorder symptoms. Some of the most common include:
Increased heart rate
Fear of being around people, especially people they don’t know
A sick or nauseous feeling in their stomachs
Fear of attending social events
Worrying about visiting a public place days or weeks in advance
Diarrhea
Difficulty talking normally in front of people
These are just a few social anxiety disorder symptoms that people might experience. They generally feel better when they attend social events with others who they trust, such as close friends or spouses.
The Link Between Social Anxiety Disorder and Addiction
Is there a link between social anxiety disorder and substance use disorder? Yes. In fact, many people try to self-medicate with drugs and alcohol instead of seeking professional help.
Unfortunately, the drugs and alcohol only provide temporary relief for the symptoms. Because of that, those who self-medicate continue to take the drugs to keep getting relief. Abusing drugs in this way can quickly lead to addiction.
At this point, getting mental health treatment is just as important as getting help for the addiction. If they only get help for the substance abuse, then their social anxiety disorder symptoms will only trigger a relapse. They must seek treatment for both issues.
We Can Help You With Underlying Mental Disorders
At Steps to Recovery, we provide treatment for substance use disorder and underlying mental disorders. We know that treating problems such as social anxiety disorder is just as important as treating the addiction itself. That’s why our Pennsylvania addiction recovery services take underlying mental disorders seriously. Some of the services and programs that we offer include:
Residential treatment
Cognitive behavioral therapy
Dual diagnosis treatment
Outpatient treatment
Aftercare
Individual and group therapies
Don’t let underlying disorders spur on your addiction. Let us teach you more about social anxiety disorder symptoms. Get help and more information today at 866-488-8684.
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How to Quit Drinking Alcohol

Learning how to quit drinking alcohol isn’t always easy. Some people can stop drinking whenever they want. Others have an unquenchable thirst for the drug that gets worse the less that they drink. When this happens, learning how to give up alcohol takes more than just willpower.
How to Quit Drinking Alcohol
Before people can learn how to quit drinking alcohol, they have to ask themselves if they’re ready for a change. Until they’re willing to stop, it’s hard to get them the help that they need. They have to want to change because quitting drinking is a journey that takes time. If they aren’t committed to the goal, they’ll likely relapse.
Lifestyle Changes
The next thing that people need to consider is lifestyle changes. To beat alcohol addiction, they have to change how they live. They must keep alcohol out of their homes and engage in activities that don’t involve alcohol use.
As part of these lifestyle changes, it’s a good idea for people to learn about alcohol. Alcohol drug education is a great way for them to learn the dangers of this drug. It’s a good idea for close friends and family members to learn about alcohol as well. The more others around them know, the better the chances that they have of cutting out alcohol altogether.
Ask for Help
When people struggle with drug addiction, they tend to forget that they can ask for help. Family and friends are often willing to lend them a helping hand. They can usually provide the push to get professional treatment to kick the bad habit.
Asking for help also shows loved ones that they’re ready to change. Showing this willingness is essential when it comes to learning how to quit drinking alcohol.
Rebuild Lines of Communication
Some people feel like they can’t ask for help because loved ones don’t talk to them anymore. The reason is usually that the alcohol abuse has broken the lines of communication between them. Family therapy and other programs in rehab can rebuild these bonds. Doing so is vital to form a system of support for after treatment.
Let Steps to Recovery Help You Today
If you have a problem with alcohol addiction, it’s time to visit an alcohol addiction treatment center. Only this type of facility can help you get better and kick your substance use disorder to the curb. Some of the programs that Steps to Recovery offers include:
Outpatient rehab program
Inpatient treatment
Family therapy
Individual and group therapies
Aftercare
Dual diagnosis treatment
Don’t let your drinking problem cause you any more harm. Learn more about how to quit drinking alcohol. Reach out to us for help today at 866-488-8684.
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