Explanation of Hydrocodone vs Oxycodone

Pain medications are one of the leading causes of addiction in the United States today, Knowledge about different pain medications is worth learning. Many people don’t know what the difference of hydrocodone vs oxycodone is and if they’re dangerous. Both of these medications help to block pain when a person has an injury, chronic pain or surgery recuperation. The issue is that both of the medications can become highly addictive and take hold of a person’s life.
Understanding Hydrocodone vs Oxycodone

When looking at hydrocodone vs oxycodone, you’ll find that they actually have more similarities than differences when taken. Both of these are narcotics and release a huge flood of dopamine in the system that the brain can become dependent on. Some people immediately develop a craving for the medication, and others develop this dependency over time. The primary difference between the medications is the side effects.
Side effects from both medications:
Shallow breathing
Drowsiness
Dry mouth
Itching
Lethargy.
Side effects specific to hydrocodone:
Seizures
Increased heart beat
Confusion
Feeling of potentially losing consciousness.
Justifying the Use of Hydrocodone vs Oxycodone
The major similarity between these two prescription painkillers is when a person develops an addiction and dependency. Addiction hijacks the brain and makes a person have a problem with separating the true from the false. This means that many people will have justifications for taking the medication even though their life is unmanageable. The person can begin to have issues with friends, family and work as a result of using either of these medications but won’t stop.
The other issue is that the similarity of hydrocodone vs oxycodone addiction can make a person feel hopeless. When the mind is telling the person that he or she needs the medication no matter what, recovery seems impossible. This is a falsehood the brain tells the person as a way to continue using the medication. The reality is that recovery is possible, and it starts by going to a qualified treatment facility for addiction.
Overcoming a Hydrocodone or Oxycodone Addiction
Steps to Recovery is here to help you overcome your prescription drug addiction and regain control. We work closely with state-of-the-art detox facilities in the area so you can lose your dependence comfortably. Once detox is complete, you’ll transition into our treatment program where we’ll show you a new way of living. Through our program, you’ll see that recovery is possible, and it’s not too late to lead an amazing life.
Our facility is located in Levittown, PA, and we treat both men and women, and we also encourage the LGBTQ community to check out our programs. Our passionate staff wants to be a part of your success in recovery from active addiction. Give us a call today to get your new life started. The number is 866-488-8684.
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Detox and Rehab are the Best Way to Deal with Heroin Withdrawal

Self-detox is very dangerous when you’re going through heroin withdrawal, and it’s also one of the leading causes of relapse. It’s understandable that you may want to detox alone because you feel like a slave to heroin. Many people try to self-detox as a way to prove that they have power over the drug. The reality is that you don’t have to do it alone, and you have a better chance of recovery by seeking some help.
What Happens During Heroin Withdrawal?

The reason people develop a heroin addiction is because the drug releases massive amounts of dopamine in the brain. Dopamine is a chemical that gives a person pleasure, but eventually, a tolerance and dependence overwhelm the person. When you use an opiate like heroin, it attaches to specific receptors in the brain that are vacant during withdrawal. As the drug leaves your system and the receptors are vacant, the brain begins to misfire causing heroin withdrawal.
Some of the most common symptoms of withdrawal from heroin include:
Nausea
Fever
Cold sweats
Aches and pains
Anxiety.
These are only some of the symptoms of heroin withdrawal, but the list is actually much longer. Long-term abuse of heroin does damage to the heart and other organs, which makes withdrawal more dangerous. There have been many cases of people who tried to self-detox, and the withdrawal led to cardiac arrest. This is one of the primary reasons why you need to get professional assistance when you’re ready to get clean.
Heroin Withdrawal Alone Often Leads to Relapse
One of the main reasons that people relapse on heroin is because the symptoms of withdrawal are so harsh. Although you may think that you can overcome the symptoms on your own, your mind severely wants heroin. At a certain point during self-detox, people often justify using again just to get rid of the withdrawal symptoms. This keeps a person in a never-ending cycle of continuing to use and never actually recovering.
How a Detox Facility Helps
Thankfully, modern medical science has new medications that greatly help with the symptoms of withdrawal. Since the symptoms of withdrawal occur from the receptors in the brain being vacant, there are ways to trick the brain. Medications like Suboxone are non-narcotic medications that act by attaching to the opiate receptors in the brain. While on this type of medication, the symptoms of withdrawal are much less severe and more manageable.
Steps to Recovery is here to help you overcome your addiction in the long run because detox is only the first step. We work with a local detox facility that will help you overcome withdrawal, but your journey doesn’t end there. It requires intensive therapy as well as a new design for living to overcome an addiction for good. Steps to Recovery has the tools you need to enjoy recovery from heroin addiction, for the last time. Call 866-488-8684.
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What Are Some Symptoms of Alcoholism?

Knowing the symptoms of alcoholism can be the difference between life and death for some people who struggle with it. The problem with alcoholism is that it’s extremely cunning, baffling and powerful, and many don’t understand it. One of the issues with alcoholism is that it affects a person’s ability to be self-aware. A person can have a severe form of alcoholism for years and not realize it, and sometimes he or she has enablers.
The Importance of Knowing the Symptoms of Alcoholism
Alcohol is legal and available everywhere in the United States. If you’re of legal age in the United States you can be served alcohol, whether you have a problem or not. There was a brief time in history where there was prohibition of liquor, but people can always find the drug they are addicted to and alcohol was no exception. The issue with liquor being such a prevalent mind-altering substance is that people can’t spot a problem. It’s much easier to identify someone who has a drug addiction, but the symptoms of alcoholism are more subtle.
Addiction is a mental illness that affects a crucial part of the brain, and it doesn’t matter what the person’s addiction is. Studies show that someone with an addiction to gambling, food or drugs has the same cognitive problem as someone with alcoholism. Many people can maintain a job or keep their family, so they don’t see alcoholism as the problem. More and more people each year are dying from alcoholism, though, so it’s important to know the symptoms.
Do You Have the Symptoms of Alcoholism?
For most people with alcoholism, drinking started moderately at parties or bars. The person may like to have some drinks with friends, and they don’t see any negatives connected with this behavior. Young people have an even bigger problem because it’s expected for people like college students to drink heavily. There comes a point where a person crosses a line and he or she no longer has control of their drinking.
The first thing alcoholism affects is the part of the brain responsible for self-awareness which leads makes denial easy. It’s important to take an honest look at the situations happen in your life to see if you have a problem. Alcoholism also affects the person’s survival instincts, so he or she will protect their drinking. There are some common signs and symptoms of alcoholism that you can look out for:
When you start drinking, is it difficult to stop?
Have friends or family members made comments about your drinking?
Do you ever feel guilty for drinking?
Have you had any problems at work as a result of drinking?
Have you ever started drinking when you said you wouldn’t drink that day?
Finding Help for Alcoholism
If you believe you or your loved one is showing the signs of alcoholism, allow Steps to Recovery to assist you. We specialize in treating people with alcoholism, and we have a convenient location in Levittown, PA. Our goal is to help people discover the source of their drinking so they can overcome it. Don’t wait another day, and call us now at 866-488-8684 for addiction treatment.
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The Mental and Physical Effects of Heroin

The disease of addiction has the power to take everything that a person has worked for and cares about. When dealing with heroin effects, there are many different physical and psychological changes and symptoms that a person must deal with. Aside from the physical dependency, a person also has to struggle with losing money, jobs, and relationships. Struggling with an addiction to heroin can make you feel isolated and alone, but there is a way to overcome addiction.
Dealing with Physical Heroin Effects
The physical heroin effects are often what keeps a person in the cycle of his or her addiction. In most cases, a person wants to get clean, but he or she can’t deal with the physical and psychological symptoms of withdrawal. No matter how much willpower a person has, the mind eventually tells him or her that using more heroin is easier than quitting. Some of the common symptoms of heroin withdrawal can include:
Aches and pains in muscles and joints
Nausea and stomach cramping
Anxiety and depression
Insomnia
Flu-like symptoms and cold sweats
The way to overcome these heroin effects is to go to a qualified heroin detox facility for help. The facility will provide you with medications and other methods that greatly reduce the symptoms of withdrawal. The medications work by making the brain believe you’re still using heroin, but you’ll only need the medications temporarily. The detox facility will give you a foundation. From detox, you need to go to a rehab facility.
Heroin Effects Change Behaviors and Thoughts
One of the downfalls of long-term addiction is that it changes who you are as a person, and it’s one of the reasons you still use the drug. When in active addiction, you become very selfish and self-centered, and these traits don’t go away immediately. Being in active addiction is a form of selfish survival mode, which is why relationships suffer. Every thought and behavior in addiction has been a way to get what you need, and that must change.
In order to overcome your addiction, you must find a new way of living, and that’s what you learn in rehab. You’ll begin to see how your actions have been affecting the people who love you the most. Healing relationships with friends, family and others can take time, but the foundation and process begin in rehab. You’ll begin to see that one day at a time, you’ll become a better person and you can be who you want to be without heroin.
Getting Help Through Treatment
If you are ready to overcome your heroin addiction, come to Steps to Recovery in Levittown, PA. We have a facility that treats men and women as well as those in the LGBTQ demographic. We’re a 12-step program based treatment facility which will greatly help you with your long-term recovery by incorporating them into your life and recovery. Your recovery from addiction doesn’t have to wait another day. Call us for the help you want at 866-488-8684.
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The Ways Behavioral Therapy Works During Detox

Substance abuse is a common problem among millions of people across the United States. It’s the precursor to addiction, but people still have control over their actions. Stopping substance abuse in its tracks is the best way to avoid addiction. Behavioral therapy can help.
What Is Behavioral Therapy?
Multiple types of therapies involve looking into behaviors. In fact, behavioral therapy is any program that attempts to modify behaviors or attitudes. The goal is to replace these negative aspects with healthy ones to prevent relapse.
Removing negative behaviors usually manages triggers that promote drug use. These triggers cause people to relapse after completing drug rehab. This result is why behavioral therapy is so important during the rehab process.
Once people finish rehab, it’s best for them to continue receiving treatment through an aftercare program. Most of the time, these programs continue counseling with behavioral therapy. This therapy involves both one-on-one and group sessions. The groups may include other people with addiction or family members.
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is a method that a psychiatrist designed to prevent relapse. In fact, he developed behavioral therapy with alcoholics in mind. Since then, however, doctors have adapted CBT to combat other drug addictions.
CBT predicts problem areas and enhances people’s self-control to deal with those problems. In general, they develop coping strategies that work for them. Many therapists use a one-on-one approach with CBT. This method makes it easier to develop a custom plan of action for each individual.
Research shows that people who take part in CBT are less likely to relapse after treatment. While it can take a long time for doctors to make progress with CBT, it’s worth it in the end. The actual time that it takes for CBT to start working, however, depends on the person being treated. Some people open up faster than others, which allows therapists to get to the root problem more quickly.
Family Therapy
Another important behavioral therapy type is family behavioral therapy (FBT). Research shows that FBT is effective for both youths and adults. As the name suggests, it involves the patient and at least one other family member.
From engaging with family members, therapists can learn more about the family dynamic. In some cases, it’s possible to determine if their roles contribute to substance abuse and offer coping skills to change roles. FBT plays an important part in outpatient and inpatient drug rehab.
Steps to Recovery Can Help You Fight Addiction
You don’t have to let addiction rule your life, and Steps to Recovery has the experience to help. We place a major focus on our outpatient rehab programs to allow our clients to continue their lives outside of rehab. Some of the programs and subjects that we cover include:
Group therapy
12-step program approach to rehab
Relapse prevention
Addiction education
Behavioral therapy
Don’t let yourself or a loved one suffer as a result of addiction. Get the help you need at a place that has the answers–Steps to Recovery. Call 866-488-8684.
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What Causes Alcoholism?

When you suspect that a loved one has an alcohol use disorder, looking for answers becomes second nature. What causes alcoholism? Could you have seen it coming? Should you have been able to?
Is There a Reason Why Some People Enjoy a Few Drinks with Friends and Others Drink to Excess?
Terming it the alcohol disorder gene, researchers continue to look for the genetic factors that predispose someone to drink. Thus far, this gene is elusive. So, what causes alcoholism as far as genetics are concerned? Interestingly, there are three commonalities among individuals with an alcohol problem.
Some people find the effects of alcohol intake or light intoxication enjoyable, which can cause an addiction.
There are varying abilities to control impulse behavior; someone with an addiction lifestyle cannot curb some impulses.
Alcohol abuse can run in the family, in which case your likelihood of suffering from the disease increases.
What Causes Alcoholism Other Possibly Genetics
If you or a loved one does not fit the genetic profile, what are other risk factors for developing alcoholism?
Benefit perception. Alcohol consumption functions as a numbing agent. When unwelcome thoughts or feelings intrude, drinking alcohol to excess can numb your mind sufficiently to ignore them. If a hangover or socially embarrassing situation occurs, you might find that the benefit of drinking outweighs the negative result.
Varied stressors with unmatched coping skills. Work, a tense home life, a midlife crisis, and a host of other stressors require coping skills. You build those over the course of your life. If something stunts their development, you find a different way of dealing with stressors. Alcohol is an easy to obtain substance for this purpose.
Traumatic experience. It doesn’t take a lot to stunt the growth of coping abilities. Trauma such as the experience of personal loss, abuse, or violence can make it impossible to develop these skills. Until you resolve the trauma, it remains in the background and heightens the likelihood of substance or alcohol abuse.
Mental health disorder. Therapists refer to the presence of addiction as well as a mental health disorder as a dual diagnosis. Frequently, people struggling with addiction do not know that they have a mental illness. Because it goes untreated, it increases the chance of falling victim to alcohol abuse.
How Influential is Someone’s Environment in a Disorder Development?
If what causes alcoholism doesn’t fit a genetic or psychological profile, therapists look at the home environment. They also investigate the social activities of someone struggling with alcohol addiction. For young adults, peer pressure is proving to be an enormous factor in the development of alcoholism. It may start as binge drinking but spirals out of control from there.
In the professional realm, senior workers in a position of authority set the tone regarding alcohol consumption. If they show that intoxication at work-related functions is okay, others follow suit. Within a family, the attitude of the head of the household determines the mindset of others toward drinking. In many cases, the behavior of parents or adults leaves an indelible mark on youngsters concerning alcohol and intoxication.
Do You or a Loved One Need Help Today?
No matter what causes alcoholism in your life or the life of a loved one, there’s help. Don’t let an addiction destroy your life, happiness, and relationships. Talk to a group of compassionate therapists who conduct alcohol counseling and help folks whether this is their first time in rehab or their tenth. Call 866-488.8684 today to reach the experts at Steps to Recovery. Together, you’ll take the first stride toward healing.
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How to Help an Addict that Happens to Be Your Sister

For many families, drug addiction is the elephant in the room. Everyone tries hard to ignore it, including those struggling with the substance abuse problem. When you’re ready to stop playing pretend and learn how to help an addict instead, there is help. If you and your sister suffer from this so-called family disease, now is the time to act.
Practice an Approach Before Talking to Your Sister
There’s a good chance that your family is already engaging in a negative dynamic. You, or other members, may have tried to discuss the subject in the past. There may have been shouting matches and slamming doors. This interaction is not how to help an addict.
Instead, approach your sister in private. Do so with the understanding that addiction is a disease that causes the sufferer to lie, cheat, manipulate, and withdraw. Communicate love and affection for your sister while you explain the ways her drug use affects you. Next, define a set of healthy boundaries that prevent your enabling of her addiction.
Resist the Temptation to Facilitate Her Drug Use
Because you practiced your approach, the conversation about boundaries should be clear and concise. Explain that you look forward to her visits as long as she’s sober when arriving. Cut off financial assistance. Most importantly, enforce the boundaries you set with her.
How to Help an Addict without Enabling
You cannot make your sister stop using and enter addiction treatment any more than you can make any person do anything. What you can do, however, includes the presentation of possible solutions. By becoming a resource and support network point person, she’ll know to seek you out when she’s ready to change.
Educate yourself on drug rehab. Rehab facilities understand that addiction is a family disease. Therapists welcome inquiries of family members on behalf of their loved ones. These experts gladly help you understand the addiction, the treatment options, and the enrollment process. There’s never any pressure to bring your sister in or talk her into entering rehab.
Participate in family therapy. When your sister does enter rehab, you’ll learn how to help an addict who’s working on her sobriety. Family therapy is an important aspect of getting well. Make yourself available to participate when the therapist invites you to come in. Encourage other family members to do the same.
Evaluate your family dynamics. Your sister’s addiction is not your fault. But you can play a role in her recovery. Be willing to examine the way your family interacts with one another, and recognize toxic behaviors. Make the changes that you see are necessary to enhance relationships with your sister.
Keep lines of communication open after rehab. Once your sister finishes her rehab stay, she’s in active recovery. Her focus will be on relapse prevention and trigger recognition. She may live in a sober living facility or still undergo outpatient rehab while living at home. Now, your addiction help calls for an emphasis on open but nonjudgmental communication.
Learn How to Help an Addict Today
Although you can’t make your sister go to rehab, you can find out how to be a catalyst for change today. Become the family member who not only mentions her addiction but also offers solutions in the form of information. The Steps to Recovery therapists routinely work with family members who want to learn how to become supportive of sober living without enabling. Call 866-488.8684 to find out what it takes.
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5 Dangerous Designer Drugs [Infographic]

What are designer drugs? The name might imply that these drugs are somehow more expensive or more appealing, but the reality is quite different. Designer drugs are simply drugs that have been designed in a lab. They are synthetic, and the following five are some of the most common and most dangerous varieties.
Methamphetamine
Methamphetamine (meth) is not a naturally occurring drug. It has to be produced in a process known as cooking. The final product, methamphetamine, increases energy, prevents sleep and may decrease appetite. If you’re wondering, what are designer drugs, then meth is one of the most obvious answers.
Bath Salts
While there are salts that are placed in a tub of warm water, the so-called bath salts, which are a designer drug, are far more dangerous. Bath salts are a synthetic drug, and they tend to be a light powder. Shockingly, just a few years ago foil packages of these dangerous bath salts could be purchased in common places like gas stations.
Ecstasy
What are designer drugs? One clear example of a designer drug is ecstasy. Ecstasy, or MDMA, is made by combining stimulants into a single dose. Depending on the batch or the maker, ecstasy might contain amphetamines, cocaine or even caffeine.
Although ecstasy is widely used by those who want to dance all night, using these pills can lead to heart failure and severe dehydration. Sometimes known as club drugs, long-term users can suffer from permanent brain damage as a result of ecstasy consumption.
Ketamine
While ketamine is a designer drug, many users don’t realize that it was designed for animals, not humans. Ketamine is a drug meant to be used as an anesthetic when animals go into surgery. When humans take ketamine, they may suffer from amnesia, hallucinations or what is called a near-death experience. Many users rapidly become addicted to the dream-like states that ketamine can create.
Rohypnol
Many people know rohypnol as a drug used in sexual assault or rape, but it is important to note that others actually consume the designer drug on their own. As a form of benzodiazepine, rohypnol can reduce anxiety and even cause sedation. However, it is dangerous as well as addictive, and it should never be used recreationally.
What are designer drugs? These five examples help answer the question. Designer drugs are just as addictive as any other form of drugs and require addiction treatment to get free. Call 866.488.8684 to learn more about Steps to Recovery and how you can end an addiction to any of these designer drugs.
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5 Dangerous Designer Drugs [Infographic]

What are designer drugs? The name might imply that these drugs are somehow more expensive or more appealing, but the reality is quite different. Designer drugs are simply drugs that have been designed in a lab. They are synthetic, and the following five are some of the most common and most dangerous varieties.
Methamphetamine
Methamphetamine (meth) is not a naturally occurring drug. It has to be produced in a process known as cooking. The final product, methamphetamine, increases energy, prevents sleep and may decrease appetite. If you’re wondering, what are designer drugs, then meth is one of the most obvious answers.
Bath Salts
While there are salts that are placed in a tub of warm water, the so-called bath salts, which are a designer drug, are far more dangerous. Bath salts are a synthetic drug, and they tend to be a light powder. Shockingly, just a few years ago foil packages of these dangerous bath salts could be purchased in common places like gas stations.
Ecstasy
What are designer drugs? One clear example of a designer drug is ecstasy. Ecstasy, or MDMA, is made by combining stimulants into a single dose. Depending on the batch or the maker, ecstasy might contain amphetamines, cocaine or even caffeine.
Although ecstasy is widely used by those who want to dance all night, using these pills can lead to heart failure and severe dehydration. Sometimes known as club drugs, long-term users can suffer from permanent brain damage as a result of ecstasy consumption.
Ketamine
While ketamine is a designer drug, many users don’t realize that it was designed for animals, not humans. Ketamine is a drug meant to be used as an anesthetic when animals go into surgery. When humans take ketamine, they may suffer from amnesia, hallucinations or what is called a near-death experience. Many users rapidly become addicted to the dream-like states that ketamine can create.
Rohypnol
Many people know rohypnol as a drug used in sexual assault or rape, but it is important to note that others actually consume the designer drug on their own. As a form of benzodiazepine, rohypnol can reduce anxiety and even cause sedation. However, it is dangerous as well as addictive, and it should never be used recreationally.
What are designer drugs? These five examples help answer the question. Designer drugs are just as addictive as any other form of drugs and require addiction treatment to get free. Call 866.488.8684 to learn more about Steps to Recovery and how you can end an addiction to any of these designer drugs.
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Drug and Alcohol Treatment Are Not for Me

There are many people who struggle with addiction, but they think that drug and alcohol treatment isn’t for them. This is a common symptom of the disease of addiction, and if you’re a loved one, it can make problems worse. The important thing to remember is that addiction is a mental illness like no other. This illness affects the brain in ways that no other illness or disease does.
Why People Think Drug and Alcohol Treatment Isn’t for Them
There’s a saying that people with an addiction suffer from “terminal uniqueness,” and it’s quite common. This means that those who are struggling with an addiction think that nobody understands what they’re going through. Not only that, but they also think that traditional methods like drug and alcohol treatment won’t work. Their mind says, “It may work for you, but it can’t work for me.”
The disease of addiction affects a part of the brain called the prefrontal cortex, and this part of the brain has many responsibilities. Some of the functions that the prefrontal cortex is responsible for include self-awareness, logical decision making and connection to others and society.
When this part of the brain isn’t functioning correctly, the person is unknowingly in a state of denial. Their lack of connection to others is what makes him or her believe that they are different. They call it terminal uniqueness because the person’s stubbornness to get help can be fatal. More and more people are passing away from drug and alcohol addiction each year, thinking that drug and alcohol treatment was not for them.
Intervening with a Loved One
The main reason thousands of people in the United States don’t get help is because of their denial of the situation. Often it takes interventions by loved ones for the person to get the help they need. If your loved one refuses to get treatment, you can call an addiction specialist or research intervention techniques. Interventions can be difficult and full of emotion, so it’s good to know what to expect before doing one. Getting a professional is your best bet.
A Change of Perspective in Drug and Alcohol Treatment
It may be difficult for a person to take that first step to get treatment, but once they’re at Steps to Recovery, it gets better. We offer a residential rehab program where you or your loved one will live at the facility. During their stay, they’ll see that they aren’t alone and there are many others with the same difficulties. They’ll begin to have their mind heal and get hope that they too can recover from their addiction.
Our facility is in Levittown, Pennsylvania, and we want everyone to feel welcome. We have gender-specific groups, and we also offer programs to the LGBTQ community. Through addiction treatment, you or your loved one will begin to gain confidence in steady and long-lasting recovery. You can find out how to take the first steps
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